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Nikon D5300 review

December 19, 2013

Overall Rating:

4

Nikon D5300


  • Features:
  • AWB Colour:
  • LCD viewfinder:
  • Dynamic Range:
  • Build/Handling:
  • Autofocus:
  • Metering:
  • Noise/resolution:

Manufacturer:

Manufacturer:

Price as Reviewed:

£749.00

With a 24.2-million-pixel-sensor, a new Expeed 4 processor, Wi-Fi and GPS functionality, has Nikon done enough to make the D5300 stand out from previous models? Read the Nikon D5300 review to find out...

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Nikon D5300 review – Build and handling

While the D5200’s body has a polycarbonate exoskeleton that is based around a metal chassis, the D5300 body is a ‘monocoque’ design. This involves using a single shell made of carbon-fibre-reinforced plastic without the metal chassis, which cuts down on weight while maintaining durability. As a result, the D5300 weighs just 480g and has dimensions of 125x98x76mm, which is 25g lighter than the D5200 and a few millimetres smaller in width and height.

The depth is unchanged, so the handgrip is still chunky and comfortable. I found that even with large lenses the D5300 felt well balanced in my hand.

The camera has minimal buttons and the layout is very simple. By hitting a button marked ‘i’, users can access the shooting menu on the LCD, which can handle most controls users are likely to need. I found myself using this for the majority of situations, although it was too slow for quick adjustment of the ISO. For this reason, I opted to set the custom function button located near the lens mount to access the ISO adjustment.

The menus are very easy to navigate and have optional tips should users not understand a setting. In general, the system is ideal for ‘entry-level’ enthusiast photographers.

  • Dioptre Adjustment: -1.7 to +1.0 dioptre
  • White Balance: Auto, 6 presets (with fine-tuning), plus custom setting
  • Video: 1920 x 1080 pixels (at 60i, 30, 25 or 24p), 1280 x 720 pixels (at 60 or 50fps), 640 x 424 pixels (at 30 or 25fps), MOV files with MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 compression
  • Built-in Flash: Yes – GN 13m @ ISO 100
  • Output Size: 6000 x 4000 pixels
  • Viewfinder Type: Pentamirror
  • Memory Card: SD and UHS-I compliant SDHC/ SDXC
  • Shutter Type: Electronically controlled focal-plane shutter
  • Field of View: 0.82x magnification
  • LCD: Articulated 3.2in LCD with 1.037 million dots
  • Sensor: 24.2-million-effective-pixel CMOS sensor
  • AF Points: 39 or 11 focus points, individually selectable AF points
  • White Balance Bracket: 3 shots in steps of one
  • Max Flash Sync: 1/200sec
  • Focal Length Mag: 1.5x
  • Exposure Modes: Auto, program, aperture priority, shutter priority, manual, 9 special effects modes, 17 scene modes and 5 presets
  • Weight: 530g approx, including battery and card
  • Power: Rechargeable Li-Ion EN-EL14a battery
  • File Format: 14-bit raw, JPEG, raw + JPEG simultaneously
  • Drive Mode: Single, continuous high at 5fps, continuous low at 3fps, self-timer, remote, quiet
  • ISO: 100-12800 (Hi mode 25,600)
  • Shutter Speeds: 30-1/4000sec in 1⁄3EV or 1/2EV steps plus bulb
  • Colour Space: Adobe RGB, sRGB
  • Lens Mount: Nikon F mount (with AF contacts)
  • RRP: £799.99 (with 18-55mm kit lens)
  • DoF Preview: Yes
  • Focusing Modes: Manual, single-shot AF, 9 points, 21 points or 39 points dynamic AF, automatic AF, 3D tracking
  • Dimensions: 125x 98 x 76mm
  • Metering System: 2016-pixel RGB metering sensor with 3D Color Matrix metering (evaluative), centreweighted and spot
  • Compression: 3-stage JPEG
  • Connectivity / Interface: USB 2.0 Hi-Speed, HMDI, 3.5mm stereo jack, accessory terminal
  • Exposure Comp: ±5EV in 1⁄3EV steps
  • Tested as: Enthusiast DSLR

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