Overall Rating:

5

Nikon D3200


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Manufacturer:

Manufacturer:

Price as Reviewed:

£559.99

It may be an entry-level camera, but the Nikon D3200 features a 24.2-million-pixel sensor that could provide the sort of image quality demanded by enthusiasts. Can the Nikon D3200 cater for all? The Nikon D3200 review find out.

Nikon D3200 at glance:

  • 24.2-million-pixel CMOS sensor
  • Expeed 3 processor (as used in the Nikon D4 and Nikon 1)
  • ISO 100-6400, extendable to ISO 12,800
  • In-depth guide mode
  • RRP £559.99 body only, or £649.99 with 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 VR lens

Nikon’s latest camera releases are a sign of things to come, with the company throwing down a weighty megapixel gauntlet to its rivals. Earlier this year, we saw the FX-format (full-frame) D800 raise the bar with 36.3 million pixels, and it proved to be the best full-frame sensor we have tested so far. Now the company’s DX-format (APS-C) line-up welcomes a 24.2-million-pixel model for the first time, in the form of the D3200. Nikon insists this is an entry-level model, sitting above but not replacing the D3100. It is safe to assume, then, that any future replacements for models higher up in the series will at the very least feature the same sensor.

Like the D3100, the new D3200 has a small body and a simple, beginner-friendly layout, being aimed at those trying out a DSLR for the first time, and ‘the family’. It begs the question whether the target user is ever likely to make the most of such a large number of pixels, and furthermore, whether the available kit lenses can do the sensor justice. Alternatively, the D3200 may turn out to be a lightweight and cost-effective back-up for those who already own an enthusiast-level camera. In either case, this is the most affordable camera around that offers such a high resolution. Whether such a high pixel count in a camera of this level is able to produce good-quality images, however, is another matter entirely.

  • External mic: Yes
  • Video: 1920 x 1080 pixels (at 30, 25 or 24fps), 1280 x 720 pixels (at 60 or 50fps), 640 x 424 pixels (at 30 or 25fps), MOV files with MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 compression
  • Built-in Flash: Yes – GN 13m @ ISO 100
  • Dioptre Adjustment: -1.7 to +0.5 dioptre, 18mm eye point
  • White Balance: Auto, 6 presets (with fine-tuning), plus custom setting
  • Shutter Type: Electronically controlled focal-plane shutter
  • Memory Card: SD and UHS-I compliant SDHC/ SDXC
  • Output Size: 6016 x 4000 pixels
  • Viewfinder Type: Pentaprism
  • LCD: 3in LCD with 921,000 dots
  • Field of View: Approx 95%
  • AF Points: Nikon Multi-CAM 1000 AF, 11 focus points (one cross-type), individually selectable AF points
  • Max Flash Sync: 1/200sec
  • Sensor: 24.2-million-effective-pixel CMOS sensor
  • White Balance Bracket: No
  • Focal Length Mag: 1.5x
  • Exposure Modes: Auto, program, aperture priority, shutter priority, manual and 6 scene modes
  • Weight: 505g approx, including battery or card/s
  • Power: Rechargeable Li-Ion EN-EL14 battery
  • File Format: Raw, JPEG, raw + JPEG simultaneously
  • Shutter Speeds: 30-1/4000sec in 1⁄3EV steps plus bulb
  • Drive Mode: 4fps
  • Colour Space: Adobe RGB, sRGB
  • Compression: 3-stage JPEG
  • Exposure Comp: ±5EV in 1⁄3EV steps
  • RRP: £559.99 (body only)
  • Lens Mount: Nikon F mount (with AF contacts)
  • ISO: ISO 100-6400 (Hi mode 12,800)
  • Focusing Modes: Manual, single-shot AF, automatic AF, continuous AF, predictive tracking AF
  • DoF Preview: Yes
  • Dimensions: 125 x 96 x 76.5mm
  • Metering System: 3D Color Matrix metering (evaluative), centreweighted (75% in centre of frame) and spot (2.5% on focus point)
  • Connectivity / Interface: USB 2.0 Hi-Speed
  • Tested as: Entry-level DSLR

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