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Olympus OM-D E-M1 review

November 7, 2013

Overall Rating:

5


  • Features:
  • AWB Colour:
  • LCD viewfinder:
  • Dynamic Range:
  • Build/Handling:
  • Autofocus:
  • Noise/resolution:
  • Metering:

Manufacturer:

Manufacturer:

Price as Reviewed:

£1,299.00

Olympus has at long last announced the replacement for the ageing E-5 DSLR, but it might not be what people were expecting. Richard Sibley tests the micro four thirds OM-D E-M1. Read the Olympus OM-D E-M1 review...

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Olympus OM-D E-M1 review – Metering

Overall, the 324-zone multi-pattern evaluative metering system works well, producing bright exposures that tend to maintain highlight detail as much as possible. Exposure compensation is easy to apply via the camera’s control dials, and spot and centreweighted metering are also available. Even more useful is the highlight and shadow spot metering that has long been a feature of Olympus cameras.

Highlight metering is more useful than shadow metering. By using highlight spot metering and pointing at a part of the scene that you wish to record as an almost white highlight, the metering will make an exposure around 2.3EV brighter than mid-grey. The resulting image will be the brightest possible exposure of the scene, with as little burnt-out highlight detail as possible. It is a great feature for those who like to ‘shoot to the right’ of the histogram, before darkening the image slightly where necessary, using software, to help keep noise to a minimum.

It is difficult to talk about the metering without mentioning the many different image adjustments. For JPEG users, there are many different ways to adjust images, and it is worth remembering that if you also save the raw files, they might look very different from the corresponding JPEG, which often show a lot lighter or darker than the implied exposure due to the application of image effects.

  • Video: 1080 HD at 30p, 720P at 30p, AVCHD, AVI Motion JPEG
  • External mic: Yes
  • Dioptre Adjustment: -4 to +2
  • White Balance: Auto, 7 presets, manual, 2 custom modes
  • Shutter Type: Computerised focal‑plane shutter
  • Built-in Flash: No. External unit supplied with GN 10m @ ISO 200 output.
  • Memory Card: SD, SDHC, SDXC, UHS-I
  • Viewfinder Type: Electronic, with 2.36 million dots
  • Output Size: 4608 x 3456 pixels
  • Field of View: 100%
  • LCD: 3in, 1.037-million-dot tilting LED
  • White Balance Bracket: Yes
  • AF Points: 81-point system, 37-point phase detection, touch focus, face and eye detection, 800 points manual selection
  • Sensor: 16.3-million-effective-pixel, micro four thirds Live MOS
  • Max Flash Sync: External flash X-sync 1/250sec and 1/4000sec (Super FP mode)
  • Exposure Modes: PASM, bulb, iAuto, 24 scene modes, 12 art filters
  • File Format: JPEG, raw (ORF), JPEG + raw, AVI (motion JPEG)
  • Power: Rechargeable Li-Ion (330 shots)
  • Weight: 497g (including battery and card)
  • Drive Mode: Up to 10fps, 3.5fps with image stabilisation
  • Shutter Speeds: 60-1/8000sec + bulb up to 30 minutes
  • Colour Space: Adobe RGB, sRGB
  • Exposure Comp: ±5EV
  • RRP: £1,299 (body only) or £1,949 with 12-40mm f/2.8 lens
  • Lens Mount: Micro four thirds
  • ISO: 100-25,600
  • Focusing Modes: Single, continuous, manual, tracking
  • DoF Preview: No (via test picture)
  • Dimensions: 130.4x93.5x63.1mm
  • Metering System: 324-zone multi-pattern TTL digital ESP, spot, centreweighted, highlight, shadow
  • Connectivity / Interface: USB, HDMI
  • Compression: 3-stage JPEG
  • Tested as: Advanced CSC

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