With its 24x optical zoom, 12 frames per second capture rate and full manual control, the DMC-FZ150 wants to be the ultimate all-in-one camera. Tim Coleman tries it out

Product Overview

Overall rating:

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150

Product:

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 review

Manufacturer:

Price as reviewed:

£420.00
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Build and Handling

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image:  Such a wide focal range makes shooting a number of situations possible, especially for good levels of detail with distant subjects

The DMC-FZ150 feels good in the hand. I like the understated contours of the handgrip and thumb rest, both of which have a good-quality leather-effect surface. The body is made mainly from a tough plastic and is lightweight, weighing 528g including card and battery.

There is a comprehensive number of controls to hand dotted around the 124.3×81.7×95.2mm body. One of these is for the continuous shooting drive mode, from where a capture rate of up to 60fps can be made. The shooting mode dial is a little overcrowded with too many modes for my liking, including PASM control and ten presets.

Other controls include a direct movie record. Stereo sound is recorded by a microphone built into the pop-up flash on the top of the camera. A hotshoe mount enables the use of compatible accessories such as a flashgun and external microphone.

At the press of a button, the user can choose between the 3in, 460,000-dot LCD screen and the built-in electronic viewfinder (EVF) for controlling, composing and viewing images. The screen is fully articulated from the side of the camera, offering a wide angle of view, with a reasonably bright and crisp output. The EVF has a resolution of 201,600 dots and is useful for bright daylight situations, but it has the rough pixelated edges often found in low-resolution viewfinders.

As the DMC-FZ150 is a superzoom camera, there is great emphasis on the handling of the lens. Its zoom function can be controlled in two ways: by the shutter or on the side of the lens through a zoom lever, which can also be assigned for focusing. We have seen a zoom lever introduced in a couple of new Lumix G micro four thirds lenses, primarily to help provide steadier handheld zoom control for video users. Having used both controls, I found that any difference in steadiness is minimal and unlikely to affect stills photographers. Nonetheless, the extra option is a useful one. An AF/macro AF or manual-focus switch is also present.

As it can become increasingly difficult to control a camera in the hand at the telephoto end of the focal length, Panasonic’s Power OIS built-in stabilisation works against the up and down movement produced when shooting handheld, giving extra flexibility for handheld, blur-free shooting in low light.

Overall, the DMC-FZ150 is a versatile camera with speedy access to a good level of manual and automatic control.

We continually check thousands of prices to show you the best deals. If you buy a product through our site we will earn a small commission from the retailer – a sort of automated referral fee – but our reviewers are always kept separate from this process. You can read more about how we make money in our Ethics Policy.

  1. 1. Features
  2. 2. Build and Handling
  3. 3. Performance
  4. 4. Resolution, Noise & Dynamic Range
  5. 5. Verdict
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