Overall Rating:

3.5

Fujifilm X-T200


  • Features:
  • Build/Handling:
  • Metering:
  • Autofocus:
  • AWB Colour:
  • Dynamic Range:
  • Image quality:
  • LCD viewfinder:

Pros:

  • + Excellent image quality, with lovely JPEG colours
  • + Fully articulated screen is great for shooting at creative angles
  • + Good range of external controls, surpassing other entry-level models
  • + Small size, light weight and attractive retro design

Cons:

  • - Sub-par autofocus performance
  • - Joystick is poorly positioned and fiddly to use
  • - Unrefined and occasionally buggy operation
  • - Touch Menu design is inconsistent and unintuitive

Manufacturer:

Manufacturer:

Price as Reviewed:

£749.00 (with XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 lens)

Can Fujifilm’s entry-level mirrorless model replicate the addictive charm of its more advanced siblings? Andy Westlake takes an in-depth look

Fujifilm X-T200: Performance

In many respects, the X-T200 is a pleasant little camera to use. With the kit zoom mounted it takes a second or so to start up, but much of this is due to the lens extending and then zooming to its most recently used position. With other lenses, the camera fires up almost instantaneously. It’s then pretty responsive to both the physical controls and the touchscreen when you need to change settings.

It’s difficult to fault the X-T200’s image quality, especially in raw. XC15-45mm F3.5-5.6 at 15mm, 1/640sec at f/8, ISO 200

The main exception comes with using the touchscreen to set the focus area when you’re using the viewfinder, which I found to be disconcertingly laggy. The focus point also has a bizarre habit of jumping to the top of the screen when you drag your thumb down to the bottom, or vice versa. This behaviour is inherited from the joystick, but is completely unintuitive when using a touchpad, and really needs to be fixed.

Fujifilm’s colour rendition is second to none. This is a JPEG straight out of the camera in Astia mode. XC 50-230mm F4.5-6.7 at 75mm, 1/110sec at f/7.1, ISO 2000

The X-T200 has a few other annoying quirks, too. For instance, some of the controls stop responding while the camera is writing files to card, which means you can’t move the focus area with the joystick, change the drive mode, or access the Q menu for a couple of seconds after taking a shot. In contrast, the top-plate dials and touchscreen continue to operate normally.

Here the sensor’s impressive dynamic range allowed me to recover lots of detail in the darker areas of the image. XC15-45mm F3.5-5.6 at 30mm, 1/60sec at f/5.6, ISO 200

It’s also worth noting that with the top-left control dial, the first click activates its function, with subsequent clicks required to change it. So if you wish to use it as an ISO control, you have to rotate it four notches to make a one-stop change, rather than the expected three. Finally if you shoot in raw only without an accompanying JPEG, then you can’t zoom in sufficiently far in playback to check critical focus.

The X-T200 gives entirely usable images at ISO 3200. XC50-230mm F4.5-6.7 at 230mm, 1/80sec at f/6.7, ISO 3200

Battery life is also disappointing. It may be rated for 270 shots per charge, but I initially got a lot less than that during normal use, because the camera seems to drain power rapidly if you forget to turn it off between shots. I’d recommend adjusting the Power Management settings to activate the Economy performance mode, and set auto power off to 2 minutes. Then its stamina becomes much more acceptable. Acquiring a spare battery is strongly recommended, too.

I converted this to black & white in raw processing. XC15-45mm F3.5-5.6 at 29mm, 1/1250sec at f/5.6, ISO 200

Thankfully, the X-T200 has the considerable saving grace of producing excellent images. Its auto white balance is generally pretty well judged, and while it has a certain tendency to meter too bright for my tastes, the accurate exposure preview in the viewfinder makes it easy to judge when to apply exposure compensation. Combine this with Fujifilm’s fabulous colour output, and it’s difficult to think to competitor that can output consistently nicer-looking photos.

Fujifilm X-T200: Image quality

One aspect of the X-T200 that really can’t be faulted is its image quality. It produces files that at least match any of its similarly priced competitors, and aren’t significantly surpassed by its more expensive 26.2MP stablemates. JPEG shooters will appreciate Fujifilm’s peerless colour science, with its Film Simulation modes providing a good range of attractive looks.

The sensor gives quite usable results at its top standard setting of ISO 12,800. XC35mm F2, 1/110sec at f/2, ISO 12,800

Raw shooters will find wider software support than for the firm’s X-Trans models, and benefit from impressively low noise, along with plenty of scope for extracting additional shadow detail at low ISO settings.

Fujifilm X-T200: Resolution

At ISO 200 in raw, the X-T200 resolves approximately 3900 lines per picture height (l/ph), which is about as much as its 24MP sensor could theoretically achieve. Fujifilm’s JPEG processing doesn’t render quite as much detail, giving 3600 l/ph at best. As usual, resolution gradually decreases as the sensitivity is raised, with ISO 6400 delivering 3400l/ph. At the top standard sensitivity of ISO 12,800 we measure 3200 l/ph, while at the highest extended JPEG-only option of ISO 51,200, this drops to just 2,800 l/ph.

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 100, JPEG

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 200, raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 400, raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 800, raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 1600, raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 3200, raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 6400, raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 12,800, raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 25,600, JPEG

Fujifilm X-T200, resolution, ISO 51,200, JPEG

Fujifilm X-T200: Noise

At ISO 200 in raw, the X-T200 resolves approximately 3900 lines per picture height (l/ph), which is about as much as its 24MP sensor could theoretically achieve. Fujifilm’s JPEG processing doesn’t render quite as much detail, giving 3600 l/ph at best. As usual, resolution gradually decreases as the sensitivity is raised, with ISO 6400 delivering 3400l/ph. At the top standard sensitivity of ISO 12,800 we measure 3200 l/ph, while at the highest extended JPEG-only option of ISO 51,200, this drops to just 2,800 l/ph.

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 100, JPEG

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 200, Raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 400, Raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 800, Raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 1600, Raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 3200, Raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 6400, Raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 12,800, Raw + Adobe Camera Raw

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 25,600, JPEG

Fujifilm X-T200, ISO 51,200, JPEG

Fujifilm X-T200: Verdict

In many ways, the X-T200 is a likeable little camera. With its three top-plate dials and focus-area joystick, it sports probably the best control layout of any entry-level model for users who harbour ambitions beyond the basic point-and-shoot. It’s also sufficiently small and lightweight to carry around all the time, with the three XC lenses providing an attractive set of options for first-time users on a budget. Best of all, it produces lovely images, with its gorgeous JPEG colour rendition being especially attractive to novice users who may not wish to dabble with raw files. But it’s horribly underpowered, which makes it very difficult to love.

Fujifilm X-T200

There’s a lot to like about the Fujifilm X-T200, but it has some significant drawbacks too

We don’t expect entry-level models to provide the same level of performance as their pricier stablemates, but the X-T200 simply doesn’t come close to the superb user experience offered by the X-T30. It’s also some distance behind cheaper competitors when it comes to speed and slickness of operation. With any luck Fujifilm will be able to put right some of its worst interface faults, including the poorly designed Touch Menu and unintuitive focus touchpad operation, via a future firmware update.

I loved the pictures I got from the X-T200, but was disappointed by certain aspects of its operation. XC15-45mm F3.5-5.6 at 38mm, 1/170sec at f/5.6, ISO 200

I really wanted to like the X-T200, but sadly its operational flaws make it hard to recommend at its £749 launch price. But if it were to drop closer to £600, it would become a more credible competitor to the Canon EOS M50 (£599 with 15-45mm zoom) and Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III (£529 with 14-42mm lens). Even then, the EOS M50 is much more successful in appealing to novice users, while the E-M10 III is probably a better choice for more experienced photographers looking for a small, lightweight camera. Finally for those intent on buying into the Fujifilm system, I’d recommend saving up for the X-T30 instead.

Fujifilm X-T200: Specifications

Fujifilm X-T200
  • Sensor : 24.2MP CMOS, 23.5mm x 15.7mm
  • Output size : 6000 x 4000
  • Focal length mag : 1.5x
  • Lens mount : Fujifilm X
  • Shutter speeds (mechanical): 30sec - 1/4000sec
  • Shutter speeds (electronic): 30sec – 1/32,000sec
  • Sensitivity (standard): ISO 200-12,800
  • Sensitivity (extended): ISO 100-51,200
  • Exposure modes : PASM, Auto, Scene, Panorama
  • Metering : Multi, Spot, Average
  • Exposure comp : +/-5 EV
  • Continuous shooting : 8fps
  • Screen : 3.5in, 2.76m-dot 16:9 touchscreen
  • Viewfinder : 2.36m-dot OLED, 0.62x magnification
  • AF points : 117 or 425
  • Video : 4K up to 30fps; Full HD up to 60fps
  • External mic : 3.5mm stereo
  • Memory card : SD, SDHC, SDXC (UHS-I)
  • Power : NP-W126S Li-ion rechargeable
  • Battery life : 270 shots (450 in Eco mode)
  • Dimensions : 121 x 83.7 x 55.1mm
  • Weight : 370g with battery and card

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