Drones have been banned from flights within 30 miles of the Super Bowl football in the United States this weekend.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued a ‘temporary flight restriction’ around the University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona.

The FAA has declared the area a ‘no drone zone’ in a video posted on YouTube.

Anyone caught breaching the rules faces possible civil penalties or criminal charges.

‘Don’t spoil the game. Leave your drone at home,’ adds the FAA.

Seattle Seahawks play New England Patriots in Sunday’s Super Bowl XLIX.

A few days ago, Amateur Photographer magazine quizzed the UK’s aviation watchdog, the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), about drone use. For details, see the video interview below:

 

caarules.lowFor the rules on drone use, published by the CAA, click HERE

RELATED ARTICLE: HOW TO FLY DRONES SAFELY

 

The FAA statement restricting drone use at the Super Bowl (as published on the FAA website):

US Federal Aviation rules governing drone use at the Super Bowl

‘The FAA will establish a Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) (PDF) that will be centered on the University of Phoenix Stadium. The TFR will consist of circular rings that will extend from the ground to 18,000 feet in altitude. The restrictions will be in effect from 3:25 p.m. local time to 11:59 p.m. local time on Feb. 1.

‘There will be a highly restricted inner ring within a 10-mile radius of the stadium in which general aviation aircraft, media, banner towers, blimps and unmanned aircraft will be prohibited. Glendale, Goodyear and Williams-Gateway airports are inside this inner ring. No general aviation operators will be able to fly into or out of these locations while the restrictions are in effect. Commercial airlines will be able to operate as usual. Approved law enforcement and air ambulance operators will be able to fly in the inner ring provided they meet certain operational requirements.

‘A second outer ring will encompass the airspace between 10 and 30 miles from the stadium. General aviation aircraft will be able to operate there provided they have filed flight plans, are using transponders that broadcast specific information about their aircraft, and are in two-way communication with air traffic controllers. Scottsdale, Deer Valley and Falcon Field airports are in this outer ring. Aircraft cannot loiter within the outer ring, and certain operations will not be allowed, including flight training, practice instrument approaches, aerobatic flight, glider operations, parachute operations, ultralight, hang gliding, balloon operations, banner towing operations, sightseeing operations, unmanned aircraft and certain other operations.

‘All unmanned aircraft operations – also known as drones—are prohibited within the restricted areas. These include model aircraft operations, model rocketry and Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). Anyone who operates an unmanned aircraft in the restricted area could face civil penalties or criminal charges.’