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Yashica 124G Medium Format

Discussion in 'Everything Film' started by Noby39, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. Noby39

    Noby39 Active Member

    I have acquired a Yashica Mat 124G camera. On opening the lid to load a 120 film roll I saw that, instead of the 120/220 adjustable pressure plate, the plate is not adjustable. This plate turned out to be for 220 roll film - which is almost impossible to get nowadays.

    I was told that I should be able to use 120 roll film in the camera without any problem, as the 120 and 220 rolls are virtually the same diameter/thickness. Would I damage the camera by using 120 roll film with a 220 roll pressure plate.

    How easily could the 220 roll pressure plate be replaced with a 120/220 adjustable plate? I wouldn't try to do that but would ask a camera repair business to do the job.

    Any help, explanations or suggestions would be much appreciated.

    Noel
     
  2. LargeFormat

    LargeFormat Well-Known Member

    I don't think you should damage the film or the camera by using 120 film in it but I do say that with some circumspection. As you probably know 220 film has no backing paper, apart from a leader, and is therefore thinnner than 120 film. The different pressure plate is to compensate for the lack of backing to maintain the focus on the film plane. As the film leader will go through I would expect 120 film to go through but I'd be inclined to test it to make sure it doesn't get stuck. I think it is true to say that most 220 cameras, apart from Linhof, will take 120 film. I was under the impression that the pressure plate on the 124G was adjustable.
     
  3. Roger_Provins

    Roger_Provins Well-Known Member

    There's an old AP thread on the subject here which may help.
     
  4. LargeFormat

    LargeFormat Well-Known Member

    Yes Roger but I think that is talking about using 220 film in a 120 camera which is more of an issue. To do that you have to seal the little red window, if there is one, and the pressure plate is more critical as there is then less pressure for the thinner film.
     
  5. zx9

    zx9 Well-Known Member

    It is, or should be IIRC the pressure plate sits on two spring loaded pins, if you apply pressure it can be slid up/down to positions for 120 or 220. It is the best part of thirty years since I owned my 124G so the exact procedure (for me)is a little lost in the midst of time!
     
  6. LargeFormat

    LargeFormat Well-Known Member

    and if you scroll down from Here you'll find the illustrated instructions.

    But having re-read your post it does sound as if you might know this and there is something odd with your camera. Please let us know how you get on.
     
  7. zx9

    zx9 Well-Known Member

    Just as I remembered :)

    I am quite intrigued now, I hope the OP lets us know how things go.
     
  8. Noby39

    Noby39 Active Member

    Thanks to all who, so far, have contributed to my query. The pressure plate does not offer a choice between 120 and 220. It is a 220 roll pressure plate. I'll run a film through the camera and let you know the results.
     
  9. LargeFormat

    LargeFormat Well-Known Member

    Are you sure that it is the 124G that you have. Before the 124 Yashica made the 12 and the 24. Separate cameras for 120 and 220. On these the pressure plate was fixed.
     
  10. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    The pressure plate on a 124G should slide, In one position it is set to use 220 film (24), when slid to the other position it will be set for 120 film (12). I owned one. The plate slides with a little pressure, the direction being obvious. By the way the lens is good, but personally I found the camera nice and light, but rather ponderous to use. I sold it on after a while. The results should not disappoint.
     
  11. Noby39

    Noby39 Active Member

    Re: Yashica 124 Medium Format

    It is a Yashica Mat 124, though I've just noticed that the "G" is missing.

    The Yashica 24 only takes 220 film, and the instruction booklet that came with the camera is for a Yashica 24. I can't find a photo of a Yashica 24 on the internet but the photo in the booklet shows a camera that looks exactly like a Yashica 124.

    The camera is labelled "124", indicating, I imagine, that it can use 120 or 220 film. It looks exactly like this: http://www.mattdentonphoto.com/cameras/yashicamat_124.html.

    I can only guess that the Yashica 124 that I have is a mislabelled camera. It may have been intended at manufacture to be a Yashica 24, but ended up with a 124 label, possibly to get rid of existing 24 stock. Alternative suggestions would be welcomed.
     
  12. zx9

    zx9 Well-Known Member

    Re: Yashica 124 Medium Format

    Just a guess as I don't know if it is possible, could a damaged 124 have been fitted with a 24 back or pressure plate? You could look to find a 124 with damaged optics / shutter and swap the back onto your good body.
     
  13. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Re: Yashica 124 Medium Format

    So far as I know the G version was a slightly improved 124, with I think gold plated electrical contacts. The 124 was also able to use both types of film. It is possible that yours has been repaired using parts from another camera, more likely than a production error.
     
  14. Noby39

    Noby39 Active Member

    Re: Yashica 124 Medium Format

    You are probably right about the camera having been repaired. I spoke earlier with a local chap who repairs cameras, including Yashica 124s. He reckons that the camera was originally a Yashica 24 model that at some time has been repaired. The part with the nameplate "Yashica 24" (which includes the light meter, etc.) was replaced during the repair with the current part bearing the "Yashica 124" nameplate. He could not think of any other explanation for the facts.
     
  15. LargeFormat

    LargeFormat Well-Known Member

    Re: Yashica 124 Medium Format

    I think the 124G was the all black version and as nimbus says there were electrical differences including a coupled match needle exposure meter. The pressure plate slides between the 120 and 220 settings as referred to in my link above whereas the 124 (with no more) pulls out and rotates. Apparently the mechanics of the non-G were tougher.
     

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