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What a dreary place this is.

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Brian, Apr 19, 2016.

  1. PhotoEcosse

    PhotoEcosse Well-Known Member

    Parachutes aren't much use in planes, either.

    I recall asking my first flying instructor why we did not have parachutes (like the spitfire pilots in the war films) to be told that there was much less chance of injury when making an unpowered emergency landing in a ploughed field (remember to land down the furrows, not across them) in a Cessna 152 than making a parachute descent without any prior instruction.
     
  2. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder

    Years ago a guy called Wills/Willis? Wrote a great book the title of which was something like " Where no birds fly" great read.
    I was fortunate in that serving in the RAF flying tuition was available at very little cost for all.
     
  3. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Umm, that's the down side, not the up side. You have to judge your approach exactly, there is only one shot. No-one ever did touch and go in a glider :) With power you can blip the engine(s) and adjust very easily.
     
  4. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    Particularly not in pre-ejector seat DeHavilland Vampires or so I believe...
     
  5. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    My first lessons were in a Chipmunk and we did have parachutes. In fact we sat on them as a seat and they were hard to walk with. Had to do bailing out training: unplug your leads (or strangle yourself), slide canopy back, hit straps release, lean over the left and grab the trailing wing edge, pull yourself down to (hopefully) miss the tail. Or just turn the thing upside down and let gravity do the work. Thankfully never had to try it for real.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2016
  6. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Or why you have lifeboats on a ship, but not little gliders on an aircraft?
     
  7. AGW

    AGW Well-Known Member

    I miss opening windows on trains.....

    Graeme
     
  8. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    I miss going to the cinema and sitting watching the film whilst drinking a pint and smoking a cigarette.
     
  9. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    I thought certain aircraft could land without an engine, seem to recall a pilot telling me he felt safer in a single engine plane than a jumbo for that reason. He could have been talking rubbish as we were in a bar at a golf club.
     
  10. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Most Northern Rail trains still have opening windows! Indeed some of their Pacer trains still have 2+3 bus seating.
     
  11. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Oh they can land, but whether they can stop in time without reverse thrust might be the question.
     
  12. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    Perhaps if they were equipped with anchors as well as life jackets..?
     
  13. PhotoEcosse

    PhotoEcosse Well-Known Member

    A light aeroplane can land perfectly safely without engine power, provided that you have sufficient altitude when the engine fails to allow you to find a safe field to come down in - without power cables, buildings and other things that might get in the way. From 4000 feet a small Cessna will fly for maybe 10 miles without power, depending upon wind speed and direction, which normally gives plenty time and space to find a safe landing site.

    When coming in without power, you just use the stick for control. (In a powered landing you control height with the throttle and speed with the stick - which sounds counter-intuitive, but it is right.) With a stall speed of about 80 knots, no engine braking is required to slow the plane after landing. In fact speed bleeds off quicker on a grass field than on a tarmacked runway.

    The major problem with engine failure in a light aircraft is if it fails at below about 500 feet on take-off.
     
  14. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    Or parachutes?;)

    Not that daft, think fighter jets and the Space Shuttle.
     
  15. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Large jets can also do it, Fishboy, if conditions are right. Remember the hero pilot who saved his 'plane & passengers, after a severe bird strike, by gliding it into the Hudson River? Cheers, Oly
     
  16. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Brian, have you got a macro for the Fuji? :) Think you ought to get one, if not. :p Cheers, Oly
     
  17. PhotoEcosse

    PhotoEcosse Well-Known Member

    Yep - that was a spectacular event. You might get away with something similar at most UK airports - except Heathrow, Gatwick, Luton and Leeds/Bradford, all of which are just too far from a suitable stretch of water.

    There are, in the UK, a few stretches of motorway that were designed to be able to provide emergency landing facilities for large aircraft by having no bridges, power lines, gantries or high bankings for several miles. But they were intended for use as a replacement for regular airports in the event of those airports being taken out by nuclear strikes. The M9, just west of Edinburgh has a stretch designed to replace Turnhouse to service the government and military bunkers at Craigiehall. But the use of motorways for this purpose needs them to be cleared of road traffic - not easy in the space of minutes in an emergency.
     
  18. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    Perhaps the government should consider this before all motorways are converted to "smart" with gantries everywhere. But where would those ever important speed, sorry safety cameras be mounted.
     
  19. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder


    Started by Pitch3110, 18th August 2013 19:18
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    729
    • Views: 101,547

    Green these are the stats on the watch forum for a thread entitled what brogues are you weariing 101,547 views!! and 729 contributions. And as for dogs, my thread is rapidly playing catch up.
     
  20. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Waking up (in a totally confused state ;)) this a.m., Eric, I suddenly remembered something I heard (via good ol' BBC Radio 4) from a pilot, probably a BALPA rep, during the sharp climb/peak of the oil price and air fuel price increases. He said on a short haul, say London-Amsterdam or Frankfurt, they would climb more steeply and throttle right back to glide in to the destination as a means of saving fuel. Wonder if they still do that at $44 a barrel? Cheers, Oly
     

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