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The spider season has started

Discussion in 'Exhibition Lounge' started by SXH, Sep 27, 2017.

  1. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    The hedges round here are awash with garden spider webs.

    So awash that this one decided to take up residence at the top of our stairwell!

    [​IMG]Garden spider by Steve Higgins, on Flickr

    I suppose this means a lot more flies about for a while.

    As a matter of interest, does anyone know why orb-web spiders always position themselves head-down in their webs?
     
  2. saxacat

    saxacat Well-Known Member

  3. Bandersnatch

    Bandersnatch Member

    Araneus Diadematus is also known as the "garden spider". Strange, as I photographed this one indoors. Camera - Nikon D40 DSLR (tripod mounted). Lens - Sigma 70-300mm macro zoom. Speed - 1/500 sec at ISO 400. Aperture - F5.3.

    aran02.jpg
     
    SXH likes this.
  4. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

  5. Bandersnatch

    Bandersnatch Member

    I photographed this Orb Web spider in September 2010. I discovered that it had spun a web suspended from a clothes line. I ran indoors to fetch my DSLR. While I was doing so, there had been a brief shower which almost totally destroyed the web. But I still managed a shot featuring raindrops on the spider itself. Camera - NIkon D40 DSLR. Lens - 18-55mm. Macro setting used. The camera was hand-held.

    spider04.jpg
     
    SXH likes this.
  6. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    As an aside, the results you get from your D40 (6.1MP!) and the ones I get from my D80 (all of 1oMP), suggest to me that pixel count is of less importance than the quality of the lenses you use.

    And talent, of course. But I'm not used to the Nikon menus yet and haven't found the talent-boost option yet... ;)


    my pic. btw is from a Lumix LF1, set to macro mode and flash on.
     
    Bandersnatch likes this.
  7. saxacat

    saxacat Well-Known Member

    [​IMG]orb spider by Eddie Conway, on Flickr

    Took this last year. The web was built on our wheelie bin, which is why it has a blue background.
     
  8. Craig20264

    Craig20264 Well-Known Member

    Maybe that's the right way up if you're a spider? I dunno :confused:
     
  9. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    In my garden this morning. The prey is a crane fly.
    MickLL

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Jacques Rebaque

    Jacques Rebaque Active Member

    1.jpg

    Last week,
     
  11. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Brings a whole new meaning to the phrase 'packed lunch'!
     
    Jacques Rebaque likes this.
  12. Bandersnatch

    Bandersnatch Member

    Housespider01.jpg

    Alternatively there are house spiders, particularly those that find their way into baths and sinks. Photographed in 2016 with a Nikon D40 DSLR. Lens - 18-55mm. Matrix metering with TTL flash. Setting - Close up. Speed 1/125 at ISO 200. Aperture F5.6.

    I entered this image into a club competition. The judge didn't like the background and he suggested that I should pick the spider up and place it somewhere else.

    I...DON'T...THINK...SO!
     
    Fishboy likes this.
  13. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    Some cracking pictures...but, in the words of Stan Freburg "Man, don't sing about spiders. I mean, like, I don't dig spiders..."

    As for picking them up...that's a big 'nope' from me.

    Cheers, Jeff
     
  14. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    As I may have said before, I am intellectually in favour of spiders - they have their place in the natural food chain, keeping down the number of flies, and being food for other animals.
    But emotionally - anything with eight legs that never trips over them is obviously an evil genius of some sort. And why do they need eight eyes? They are obviously up to something! :eek:
     
  15. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    hmmm a web of intrigue....
     
  16. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    IIRC it shared the same sensor as my D50 has and I've had some cracking shots with that using a decent lens.

    [/quote]And talent, of course. But I'm not used to the Nikon menus yet and haven't found the talent-boost option yet... ;)
    .[/QUOTE]

    Don't bother, there isn't one, I've looked...:rolleyes: They don't have it on Canons either - and you know how they love gimmicks...:D
     
    SXH likes this.
  17. Jacques Rebaque

    Jacques Rebaque Active Member

    I really liked the sensor on my Nikon D200 (same as D80 IIRC) it was a CCD as opposed to CMOS. When I am trawling my old pictures they still seem to have that magical quality about them, unless I was just a better photographer back then!!
     
  18. IvorCamera

    IvorCamera In the Stop Bath

    Here's one from Australia, I don't know what its name is I did not hang around long enough to ask! From Ozzy with Love.JPG
     
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  19. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Yeah, the D80 was the last model to use a CCD sensor, or one of them, at any rate, and I thought that might by why the colours seem better.

    However, reading up about it on various photo sites, it seems it's more likely to be the software that does the JPEG conversion that is responsible.

    I shall find out when I start using RAW with the D80.
     
  20. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    A quick Google suggests it could be a Garden Orb-weaving spider (Eriophora sp.), though they are apparently nocturnal.
     
    IvorCamera likes this.

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