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The Five Principles of Pentax

Discussion in 'Pentax Chat' started by SXH, Oct 27, 2020.

  1. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Apart from number 5 (which should have "but ignore it unless they want another DSLR" as a rider), do any of these 'principles' actually mean anything sensible?
     
  2. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    It's pretty much the standard of drivel you get when they appoint the Chairman's nephew as head of corporate communications, not realising that he really can get into serious trouble with that... :p
     
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  3. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Number 4 seems reasonable, as does 3. Other stuff 'mere puff"
     
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  4. beatnik69

    beatnik69 Well-Known Member

    I'm not sure about 4. Sounds like a bit of a get out clause for when things go tits up.
     
  5. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    User error?
     
  6. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    ..... and for everything else, there is Mastercard.

    Number 2 should have something in it about being profitable in order to sustain the business. It's all well and good making nice cameras that are a pleasure to use, but if the company making them loses money, it will not be able to survive
     
  7. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    It’s a variant on a mission statement. The basic idea is fine - define the purpose for being - but articulation usually ends up more asinine than erudite.
     
  8. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    What a load of tripe. A brand that was one of the biggest sellers until the autofocus era, then produced model after model that was simply inferior. I am impressed by the brand loyalty of their band of users, nowadays anybody buying with their head rather than their heart buys something else (personal opinion). I did actually try one model (K10D I think) as I had a number of K mount lenses, it was sold on very quickly, appalling camera imho, the worst DSLR I have handled by quite a margin.
     
  9. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I suspect the statements originated in Japanese and there are almost certainly alternative interpretations.
     
  10. John Farrell

    John Farrell Well-Known Member

    I wonder what their mission statement was, when they were making the Spotmatic, and the K series cameras?
     
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  11. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Had you asked them back then, the response would have been "what is a mission statement?";). They just got on with the job.
     
  12. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    I suspect their reply would have been along the lines of, "Well, <other camera company> do their <model name> and we think we can do much better than that."
     
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  13. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I've been trying to remember when I first came across mission statements, or rather the time at which they became "so important" at every level that we had to sit around at work thinking about it, even at individual team level. I'd guess early to mid 1990's. They were certainly endemic by 2000.
     
  14. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I think it goes back much further, companies used to have a motto and I think it all stems from that.
     
  15. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Back in the late 1960s the press photographers I knew fell into 2 groups: those who used a Rollei and the others. Among "the others", those who had to buy their own kit mostly used Pentax SVs and those who had it bought for them were mostly issued with Nikon Fs.

    I was working on a North London weekly at the time and we had two staff photographers: one used a Rollei and the other used a Canon 7 rangefinder. Just goes to show that there are no rigid rules in photography. :D
     
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  16. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Briefly searching, the principle goes back to the 1940s, I’d guess that it might even have a military origin, and it is an eminently sound idea. At some point though everyone needed to have one. I suppose Gene Roddenberry could be blamed but it’s more likely to have been McKinsey.
     
  17. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Cristóbal Colón (better known to us Anglos as Christopher Columbus) certainly had one: sail west, find the east coast of India, make lots of money for the King and Queen. Well, two out of three is a reasonable result... ;)
     
  18. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member


    James Jarche started out with a large/medium format SLR, finished up with a Leica, and of all things between used a Purma Special.
     
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  19. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Good tip, I'd never heard the name before though I've seen some of the images described in the Wikipedia article.
     
  20. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    There was a really good TV program a few years ago with his grandson (one David Suchet) using his grandfather's Leica to revisit some of the things Jarche had photographed. It was quite obvious that Suchet is a pretty decent photographer himself, and really put the Leica to good use - though there was one hilarious moment where he opened it without rewinding, and berated himself on Grandad's behalf for losing the film.
     

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