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That was lucky

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by dream_police, Aug 4, 2020.

  1. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    It is dangerous stuff. No need to invoke other fuels. The last big one I remember was in Toulouse - I'm surprised to find it was in 2001 - how time flies as you get older. That was 200 tonnes. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toulouse_chemical_factory_explosion
     
  2. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

    That's about it - and when we have oxides together with a fuel source, shit happens. Everything else is a chain reaction.
     
    Learning likes this.
  3. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    It's fair to say the port of Beirut is going to be out of action for a while. (image from BBC website)

    452bcca8-1edf-44fe-b5e4-051c3835dc3f.jpg
     
  4. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    Holy sh*t! How many tons of grain is that gone to waste?

    (apart from anything else - it's just that the colour of the grain spilling from the silos caught my eye)
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2020
  5. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    We were going to visit Beirut this year if it hadn't been for COVID. No doubt my cousin will have moved on to a new area by the time it's ready for visitors again.
     
  6. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    Nitrates are powerful oxidising agents, and ammonia is flammable, so it is it's own built in bomb.
    2750 tonnes of the stuff is not far off the power of a small atomic bomb, putting that in a built up area is of itself culpable.
     
    Learning likes this.
  7. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    I'm sure I read 50,000 tonnes. More importantly, looking at the map of the scene, those silos probably protected downtown Beirut (in the background of that photo) from the worst of the blast. My eyes were drawn to the half a cargo ship left high and dry.
     
  8. WillieJ

    WillieJ Well-Known Member

    Beeb news says it was a tenth of the power of the Hiroshima bomb.
     
  9. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    Yep, sounds about right 1.5kt. There are sub kiloton yield "battlefield" nukes.
     
  10. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Any likes from me on this thread are likes of agreement.
     
  11. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    This could have been worse. Look at the brown fumes. With fuel to be oxidised far worse.
    I hope we don't have kiloton piles of this stuff in Britain.
    The last big explosion in Britain I think was Flixborough. A different chemical and reaction and a good half mile or more from habitation.
    Terrorism is not the only cause of fatal explosions.
     
  12. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Buncefield, in 2005.
     
  13. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    The plume from Buncefield was visible from London.

    Before anyone jumps on me, I know there's a difference between setting off 1500 tonnes of TNT and a 1.5kt nuke. Heat flash and gamma for two.
     
  14. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    I suppose that our natural gas terminals are a risk.
     
  15. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Don’t lose any sleep over it. The major risk event (one with highest likelihood ) is not a gas terminal incident. It is someone putting a JCB back-hoe into a gas pipeline.
     
  16. MPB

    MPB Well-Known Member

    Too Close for comfort especially in the northwest of England could be done very easily or worse
     
  17. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Spare a thought for those of us (not me, thankfully, but it'd still feck things up royally) who live in proximity to Faslane, ever in fear of things going pear/mushroom shaped...
     
    Catriona likes this.
  18. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    I grew up near Greenham Common. Close enough for the B-47 Stratojets to rattle the crockery on take off (before I was born) and close enough to know that in the event of nuclear war with the Soviets, I wouldn't have needed to worry about the fallout.
     
    Zou likes this.
  19. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    I policed a few of those protests and missile movements back in the day.
     
  20. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Are you CND? I would not be surprised,
     

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