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Technically competent, artistically challenged

Discussion in 'Help Team' started by dazdmc, Jan 13, 2020.

  1. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I had the opposite experience when trying to take street shots in town. If anyone noticed, they apologised and hurried past! Not what I wanted them to do. :)
     
    Geren likes this.
  2. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    The very worst are the smartphone users shooting 'films' who insist in slowly walking around the subject for 10 or 15 minutes and expecting everybody else to keep out of their way. When 'home movies' were expensive to make, sensible people kept them short which also reduced the chance of boring viewers to death. I pity anybody who has to watch some of these smartphone 'films' - and I really do know what a truly boring films is, having attended an all-night showing of four Andy Warhol fils at the NFT when I was 18 (at least the photographer knew how to use a tripod so that the audience didn't get seasick too).
     
  3. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    To answer in sequence:

    There is no correlation between being selfish and manipulating images, just that if somebody is at home working on their images thay cannot at the same time act selfishly elsewhere.

    There is no correlation between the hardware somebody uses and how selfish they can be, I was just quoting one example. I could also have mentioned smartphone users making 'films', or any other kind of camera. The point was about their selfishness, not about their hardware. Also, if they can only produce an image that I may like at the cost of ruining the shots that other people have patiently been waiting to get, what value that image?
     
  4. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Well I suspect any liquid developer might have deteriorated a little...
     
  5. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Some people seem to have to do this with just about everything they see, then feel the need to share it with people who really don't give a **** (fill with your own choice of word).
     
  6. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    If someone gets in your way just find a different viewpoint or subject. When I did pictures for local newspapers (a very long time ago) the sight of the local press pack always persuaded me to go elsewhere. Didn’t seem to harm my sales. ;)
     
    Catriona likes this.
  7. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    My experience happened at a 'heritage' steam railway that I had travelled 30 miles to visit in order to see a recently restored locomotive of the type that I recalled travelling behind on the Waterloo to Exeter line in my childhood. I was at the end of the station platform, in a position where nobody could stand in front of me because a fence blocked access to the track. This was the only position from which I could get the shot I wanted. Then somebody with a camera walked around the fence and stood in front of me...

    Later in the day I managed to get the shot, and it turned out so well that I have now had a large print done for my 'man cave' wall. But the lighting was even better earlier in the day.
     
  8. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    "Excuse me, you're blocking a shot I've been setting up for since I arrived, could you stand somewhere else? Really appreciate it."
     
  9. Trannifan

    Trannifan Well-Known Member

    I forgot to add that, in the second case, I was standing alone, no crowd near me!
     
  10. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    I suspect the reply, if given, would be brief and blunt. It's not as if I my camera were invisible.
    If selfish and inconsiderate people respond politely to your polite requests, you are fortunate.
     
  11. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    You're assumption that they were selfish and inconsiderate rather than just oblivious may be part of the issue. They may not have realised they were in the way, or realised what you were doing, or even noticed you in the first place. If I ask someone to move (and I have, and I've been asked to move when I didn't see someone) and they don't, then sure, I'll moan, but so far, most people are apologetic regardless of how big their camera is.
     
    Zou likes this.
  12. PentaxManiac

    PentaxManiac Well-Known Member

    I'm by no means a technocrat, but I find the AP reviews easy to follow. So should anyone with a working knowledge of photography.
     
  13. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    I would comment that many people are oblivious to a greater or lesser extent quite a lot of the time, notice how often pedestrians collide with each other or drivers pull out of junctions immediately in the path of an oncoming vehicle, so in a photographic situation they will be just the same.
     
  14. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    There was a letter about this in a recent issue, referring to all the technical terms used (invented?) by various manufacturers to describe all the 'essential' exciting features on their new models. Too many acronyms were used without explanation of what they meant: perhaps this was AP's unintentional version of Private Eye's 'Pseuds Corner'.
     
  15. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I wonder how many people didn't get the shot they wanted because you stood and waited and waited for the right moment? Are you aware of those behind you? Or who arrive and leave in disappointment?

    I do remember taking my sister and partner to the Callanish Stones when they were up for a short holiday. When we got there, a group of three had surrounded the central round area with tripods and cameras. Such is life. We walked around the site and enjoyed being so close to the stones and the views and they managed a few photos as well as enjoying the experience up close (unlike Stone Henge).
    We lunched at the cafe then went out again to the site. The guys were still there, just looking down where their cameras were pointing at the ground.
    I smiled and remarked, with a smile, has it moved yet? They had the grace to smile and shake their heads.
    We shook ours and went home.
     
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  16. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    I even moved slightly to one side to allow another (considerate) photographer to stand beside me, and he shared my frustration as the selfish man who had obviously seen us but still chose go round the fence to stand in front of us. Our problem is that our subject was not stationary, and there were only a few seconds to get the shot we wanted. Some people have the ability to be completely oblivious of others when doing exactly what they want, and many of them drive their cars with the same attitude.

    I had managed to visit the railway on a weekday during term time, so don't know how what else I could have done to minimise the risk of meeting selfish photographers. If I had gone at a weekend or during school holidays perhaps I would have been less surprised.
     
  17. dazdmc

    dazdmc Active Member

    Apologies for the late reply and thanks for your replies.
    I understand and use compositional techniques like the rule of thirds, leading lines etc. I am starting to think I need to find and concentrate on something I enjoy, since I got the digital SLR I have been taking pictures of everything and don't think I'm putting enough effort in to get the rewards. Also, looking back over some of my recent stuff I've been trying to make everything sharp and in focus throughout the whole scene which leads to flat, dull and boring shots? When I used film I got quite into macro and abstract so perhaps I need to set myself a challenge to get back into that to give me some focus.

    To answer a previous question from Catriona
    Do I enjoy post processing? Not in digital terms, I absolutely hate it and find it tedious and frustrating. But that probably comes from the fact that I am just starting to learn how to do it and everything is taking me such a long time to do. I am not against it as it's just another tool to be used to get what you want. But yes I loved the darkroom and manipulating prints, probably more than shooting the film in fact. To me there's no real difference between manipulating in the darkroom or digitaly. The only thing I don't like about digitaly manipulated images is when they are overdone and look faked, unless of course that was the intention.
     
  18. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Unless it is something really complicated you are trying to achieve then you are probably overdoing it. I always do some processing as I start with raw files but it mainly revolves around colour choice (e.g. standard, faithful or landscape start points), some global contrast and brightness adjustment and straightening because I always tilt the camera. This takes very little time. Sometimes local adjustments are called for and they take a little longer as it is easy to overdo.
     
  19. dazdmc

    dazdmc Active Member

    I try to set as much as I can "in camera" as I find it easier than post processing. I use a lot of custom picture control and I'm afraid I am a fan of the Ken Rockwell super saturated look and also set in camera sharpening. I too only adjust contrast and brightness along with cropping on the pc (colour images), not that I'm against anything more but I just don't understand the rest yet and I'm not sure I am willing to invest the limited time I have in anything more. At the moment I am concentrating on converting colour and IR images into black and white but there are so many different ways of doing it it's a bit mind boggling!!! I shoot RAW and jpeg when doing B+W, the jpeg lets me see straight away if the image works and I have the RAW file to use later on. I usually use the Kodak Tmax 400 from the Nikon picture control editor but am wanting to find something with more contrast.
     
  20. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    There is case for leaving the camera on a mono-setting in order to assess the image on the LCD. I always imagined I’d use lots of mono when I moved to digital from film but somehow the colour generally won me over. I stopped saving JPGs because the Canon raw processing software gives exactly the same results as in-camera processing. Lightroom emulations are close but not the same. I don’t know about Nikon but Canon allow (I assume they still do, haven’t tried it for years) you to develop custom profiles and upload them to the camera. The so-called picture style editor was pretty awful to use though.
     

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