1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Stop me hating my camera

Discussion in 'Fujifilm Cameras' started by grove39, Jun 9, 2014.

  1. grove39

    grove39 Well-Known Member

    I own a F80 EXR and just lately have started looking at newer stuff i really cant afford at all but for some weird reason it is making me hate my camera.

    I know i'm limited by the F80 EXR due to the type of camera it is but how can i start to like it again ?
     
  2. southonline

    southonline Well-Known Member

    we wouldn't be human if we didn't look at other cameras / equipment and get envious, but its a case of working with what you have and getting out and taking photos, that reminds you why you bought the camera - so get out and take photos
     
  3. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Agree with southonline. Don't automatically think that buying a better camera will naturally make your pictures 'better'.

    Read as much as possible about photography: AP for starters, other books, magazines, on-line, etc. Go to exhibitions. Look at photographs. Ask yurself why you like/do not like them. Why they might be considered 'good' or 'bad' or somewhere in between.

    Reckon after about a month of the above, you will be loving your camera again!
     
  4. grove39

    grove39 Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the replies.

    I'm sure it all down to envy in the end and i'm sure that the camera i have will take just as good a photo as something brand new.

    I think most of it has been caused by being at a convention lately and seeing people with all these big shiny cameras and then me looking at mine and feeling a bit inadequate lol

    Will try and love what i have until i can afford something a bit newer and shinier haha
     
  5. Snorri

    Snorri Well-Known Member

    It did get good reviews on the sensor and low light performance and even if there is a newer, better looking and more expensive model it does not change that fact.
    Try to get the best out of it's strength, with a bit of care it should be capable of some exelent shots.
     
  6. grove39

    grove39 Well-Known Member

    I used it a couple of weeks ago at Comic Con London (not a comic geek, took my kids there lol) and i did get a few good ones.

    I'll be honest, the flash is pretty much turned off all of the time due to it being a bit crap. The pics i had taken inside were pretty good without it.

    I will at some point go down the DSLR route and keep this one as a point and shoot for when i don't want a bigger camera with me.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    On full zoom thought the pics do suffer a bit but i guess you would expect that.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Like i said , it doesnt do too bad and sometimes i get excellent shots but a day of taking pics can also end up with a ton of crap ones but that might just be me.


    btw, not trying to show off my photography skills because i do not have any haha.
     
  7. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    The F80 EXR was a very good camera in its day, and I am sure it is still perfectly capable of taking excellent shots.

    Not just you; in many situations, 1 out of 20 or 30 is considered a reasonably good "hit rate"
     
  8. grove39

    grove39 Well-Known Member

    Ok, that makes me feel a lot better lol

    I have recently discovered it has a burst mode (yes, after 3 or more years of owning it lol), so i might play around with that too, which should in theory reduce my crap photo quota :)

    Soon as i get some time i'll probably go out and see what i can get out of it.
     
  9. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Just looking at your pics brings three things to mind:
    1. Try to get to know the limitations of the camera - it actually has done amazingly well for the three posed with ship in background in a very contrasty light situation. If it did that without fill-flash then that's pretty good.
    2. Just thinking about a shot before hitting the button will improve your success rate. Look at the two men talking - what's intruding from the left? There's also a lot of space around the r/h one, bearing in mind the panelling joins in the background a move closer with the feet and/or the zoom button could have tightened & improved the composition.
    3. Your eyes should have told you that the costumed girl & guy in front of a bright shop would be underexposed and needed a blip of flash but this comes from experience.

    It will seem like it takes ages when you first try it, but as you are about to take a photo, train your eye to go all around the image as you have it framed:
    > Look at what's light & dark
    > Look at background, mid-ground & foreground
    > Look at verticals & horizontals

    Ask yourself:
    > Is there anything that will give exposure problems?
    > Is there anything intruding, sticking in from the edges, out of peoples' heads, etc
    > Is there anything competing with my main subject? Is it likely to be too dark in relation to the rest of the scene
    > Is there anything distracting, light areas, bits'n'pieces, etc., especially in corners or at edges of the frame

    If you work at this, what takes seconds (but seems like minutes) at first will eventually be done in miliseconds or even before you lift the camera to the eye.

    Don't give up. Effort you put in with your existing camera will still bear fruit should you change it. Good luck and have fun.
     
  10. grove39

    grove39 Well-Known Member

    1. Try to get to know the limitations of the camera - it actually has done amazingly well for the three posed with ship in background in a very contrasty light situation. If it did that without fill-flash then that's pretty good.

    FLash wasn't used all day long

    2. Just thinking about a shot before hitting the button will improve your success rate. Look at the two men talking - what's intruding from the left? There's also a lot of space around the r/h one, bearing in mind the panelling joins in the background a move closer with the feet and/or the zoom button could have tightened & improved the composition.

    That one was a bit of a nightmare due to the 2 men being in a cordoned off area that i couldnt get closer to and i was being pushed from both sides by people also trying to get pics lol (fella on the right is a soap actor)

    3. Your eyes should have told you that the costumed girl & guy in front of a bright shop would be underexposed and needed a blip of flash but this comes from experience.

    Was about 30 feet or so away from them and the flash wouldn't have even reached. The flash on the f80 EXR is useless at the best of times lol

    But with all that being said i will take your advice and work on trying to take better pics in the future.

    I do have a few friends who have big expensive cameras and dont even seem interested when it comes to my tiny Fuji even though at times i get pics better than they do.

    Thanks for the comments and advice.
     
  11. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    So, no reason to hate your camera then.
    A talented (or hard-working) photographer who can get the most out of his/her equipment can often beat those with "all the gear and no idea".
    You may feel frustrated by the limitations of your camera but by putting in the effort, you can often more-than-make-up for the shortfall and out-do your friends with mre expensive gear.
    There's nothing wrong with wiching that you had something better yourself, and saving up for it !
    Keep plugging away, good luck and I'm sure you have the desire to succeed
     
  12. grove39

    grove39 Well-Known Member

    I did have ONE photo accepted by Dreamstime Stock Photo website today so it has restored a little faith in myself and my camera so i'm going to stick at it and just shoot like mad and hope i get a few good ones.
     
  13. southonline

    southonline Well-Known Member

    really thats all it took !! - I'd be a lot more happier if I took photos that I was pleased with rather than some stock site that takes in thousands of photos a day
     
  14. grove39

    grove39 Well-Known Member

    I'm also going to go buy a Nikon D3200 too.
     
  15. southonline

    southonline Well-Known Member

    moving in the right direction...one day you'll trade to a really good " Canon" ;o)
     
  16. grove39

    grove39 Well-Known Member

    I was in Jessops this morning playing with all the cameras and the Canons didnt feel right.

    Not sure what is different about the grip on a Canon compared to the Nikon but it did feel a little strange.
     
  17. southonline

    southonline Well-Known Member

    well thats the important thing as your going to be holding it for a long time ;o)
     
  18. grove39

    grove39 Well-Known Member

    As soon as i picked up a 1200D i noticed the grip just felt wrong, too square almost.

    But the Nikon seemed to not have a bit of plastic where the Canon did.

    If that makes sense.
     
  19. psj23

    psj23 Well-Known Member

    Just a thought: the Fujifilm X-E1 with 18–55mm lens is selling quite cheaply nowadays. It's a really nice camera if you're wanting to stick with Fuji. Thing is, if you apply some of the advice then, with practice, your F80 should be more than adequate – I base that on some of your own sample pics.
     
  20. mikeparker59

    mikeparker59 Well-Known Member

    I bought an X-E1 at the new tempting price and the offer of a free telephoto lens, a great deal. The quality of the photos i've got with it are easily equal to my 60D but with less weight to carry around. It's by no means a perfect camera I took it away on a weeks photo holiday to Italy. The handling really irritated me on times yet at other times I preferred it to my Canon.

    Good points so light to carry around all day. The EVF was useful for interior shots. I loved the exposure bracketing that displayed the three bracketed shots side by side in the viewfinder after taking. The electronic level visible in the viewfinder was great, I enjoyed using the sweep panorama function, though it took a little practice to sweep at the correct speed.

    Bad points, terrible battery life compared to my 60D. I can shoot for about 2 and a half days with a fully charged battery in the Canon. I needed to change the battery at least once sometimes twice a day on the Fuji, and they take nearly 2 and a half hours to recharge. Far too easy to switch the camera on when putting back in the camera bag, On Off switch is not stiff enough. very easy to accidentally alter exposure compensation again the dial is not stiff enough. Macro button too easy to activate avccidentally as is the quick menu button. EVF can be difficult to see in bright sunlight though much better than a rear display. The viewfinder could do with an eye cup.shade as it's stray light enetring the viewfinder that caused the problem shielding it with my hand helped enormously. Shutter button too agressive, not enough feel to it, so easy to fire off a shot when trying to half press and recompose.
    The rear display doesn't do your shots justice they will look far better on your PC than the rear display.

    here's an example of what this camera can achieve.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeparker59/14279077357

    [​IMG]

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeparker59/14291928858/in/photostream/

    [​IMG]

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeparker59/14291689720/in/photostream/

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page