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Stanley Kubrick Shots: A Masterclass In Visuals

Discussion in 'Everything Film' started by Sanjeev Nanda, Apr 4, 2020.

  1. Sanjeev Nanda

    Sanjeev Nanda Active Member

    <3 Oh! My knowledge in classical music is a bit weak. +1 on the mention Steve! Thank you

    I can imagine Lang being overwhelmed by the entire arrangement. Hahahaha your Robocop comment made me laugh hard - only because it's true! For the time, as well as the costume design done, the "Maschinenmensch" (so she is called, I googled it lmao) is beyond breathtaking. Robocop cant even compete with that!
    ~Sanjeev Nanda
     
  2. Sanjeev Nanda

    Sanjeev Nanda Active Member

  3. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    Are you referring to 'Metropolis' or 'M'? I've seen (and heard) 'Metropolis' with the Moroder soundtrack, but cannot find a version of 'M' with one. The BFFC website lists 5 'video' versions of 'M', and has the warning 'Contains mild language, violence and scenes of smoking' (nothing about child abduction and murder). This website is very useful when considering the purchase old films on DVD.

    https://www.bbfc.co.uk/search/relea...y/0/any/any/any/any/any/any/any?advanced=true
     
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  4. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

     
  5. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Metropolis. Sorry for confusion.
     
  6. Sanjeev Nanda

    Sanjeev Nanda Active Member

    I just added it on my Spotify - thanks for the recommendation Chester!
     
  7. Sanjeev Nanda

    Sanjeev Nanda Active Member

    I saw 'M' btw. It is really gripping, in a way that most modern movies are not. The cinematography is absolutely "NEXT-LEVEL", to say the least. The ending is a bit anti-climatic, but apt all the same. As a fan of photography, I must say the movie delivers, and then some! The themes the movie handles can get really heavy for sure, but the score really settles you in for the entire duration. +1 on the recommend @Andrew Flannigan !
    ~Sanjeev Nanda
     
  8. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    when I was at school in the late 40's, probably 1949, we were shown Metropolis over two evenings on 16mm. it was the original full version that is now missing. It created a real buzz in the school for several weeks after. what amazed me twas that some boys did not turn up to watch on the second night. The only other two night film that we were shown was Gone with the wind. but we were shown many other Art films still in the catalogues at that time. I saw many of them between 1948 and 1952. some of them like Metropolis were quite old prints, and often broke in the middle of performances with much accompanying hissing and laughter.
     
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  9. Sanjeev Nanda

    Sanjeev Nanda Active Member

    It's amazing that you had the privilege of seeing this gem of a movie, nearly two decades removed from it's original release. Given that film preservation wasn't a great deal back then, as it is now, it's understandable that the print you saw must've given in. Nevertheless, I cannot wrap my head around the fact that as children, you were shown such a deeply insightful film, such as Metropolis. Not only that, but your school wasn't shying away from showing you other Art films as well. I'm low-key jealous now thinking about this. The max we got out of the convent I studied in, were biblical low budget movies that nobody had heard of!
    Appreciation for metaphorical masterpieces like Metropolis, is directly proportional to the age of the viewer - the more experienced they are, the more they admire what the movie has set out to convey.
    ~Sanjeev Nanda
     
  10. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Hot take: Watched 2001: A Space Odyssey recently and it's an awful film with some amazing visuals. I bet it was an experience to see it in the cinema, and I bet many people are unable to shed that to look at whether it's a good film. I can't unremember my joy at certain movies and see them for the crap they are either.
     
  11. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    I have to ask: what size screen? Sadly, you'll probably never get the chance to see it on a large cinema screen, and I only have the memory of doing so. The same applies to 'Gone With The Wind' (the 1970s 70 mm print, although the original 1.33:1 frame was cropped to 2.33:1 for this, with film grain the size of a football), 'Spartacus' (the 70 mm print of the restored version), 'War and Peace' (the 70 mm print of the 1967 Soviet version), 'Bambi' (the restored version reissued in the early 1990s) and 'Lawrence of Arabia' (the restored version), to list just the first few that come to mind. The multi-plane animation of 'Bambi' was amazing to watch, especially on a big screen.

    The same problem arises with still images -I cannot understand how many people can offer an opinion on a photograph after only looking at it on a smartphone, when a large print is the best way make a judgement.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2020
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  12. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

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  13. Sanjeev Nanda

    Sanjeev Nanda Active Member

    I see where you are coming from, @EightBitTony. Seeing 2001 ASO in the 21st century, can be really jarring for some. For its time, the movie was unlike anything Hollywood had seen before - it was frankly out of place within the industry, and hence stuck out like a huge sore thumb. The VFX (which, again, is 0% CGI), wasn't codified as a genre staple for movies in 1968 - that happened with the release of A New Hope in 1977, when VFX, and the big Hollywood blockbuster were stitched at the seams for decades to come. Think of 2001 ASO as an Artistic endeavor, and much less as an Art movie, or even a Hollywood project for that matter. A movie, much like a photograph, encompasses more than just what meets the eye. The canvas is broad enough to accommodate the subject matter, as well as the technicality, as two distinct subsets within the unified whole - one need only focus on what appeals to them, much like a painting, if you will.

    A poignant response, @Chester AP! I am inclined to agree with what you're saying - the way one 'experiences' a movie, can really make all the difference in the world. A movie such as 2001: A Space Odyssey can become something else, with the glorious visuals, sweeping orchestral score, and Kubrick's nuanced cinematography - in a theatrical setting (or at the least, a home-movie rig). I can imagine a smartphone being less than optimal in this regard. Those who remaster older movies to a more SD, HD, or higher resolution, go really unsung when film preservation is talked about.
    On a tangent: Multi-Plane animation really immerses the viewer into the movie! I wish such movies were released for public consumption in theaters once more! I wasn't lucky enough to watch any of the movies from that era on the big screen.
    ~Sanjeev Nanda
     
  14. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    A picture either catches my attention or not. Then again, I don't think technical quality is important in many types of image. Take a look at Robert Capa's most famous pictures as an example..
     
  15. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    My school must have had a Master who was interested in film, and as it was a boarding school, there was a captive audience for such things. " Big Films" like metropolis were open to the whole school, though many other "Art Film" were seen by those in the "Film Club" by choice.

    During the School Holidays I had a Trade film pass ( my step father was a production director in a film company) The pass let me see "trade shows" of new films before they were released ( for Free) It also let me see any film for free in most of the large cinema chains, but not individual cinemas. as a result I was somewhat over saturated with films, and became rather jaded. even to this day I find it difficult to watch many film right through, and tend to walk out early, or switch over if watching on TV.

    At one trade show in 1950 I was a guest at the showing of a rather dreadful "B" movie that my step father had an interest in. Called "The Girl who Couldn't quite." I At 15, was seated next to Petula Clark a then 18 year old pig tailed beauty and up and coming actress, but before her first real success in 1952. That is perhaps the only way I could I remember such a film. Though Norman Lee was actually a very accomplished director/ script writer who started film making in the "Silent" days.. in later life he wrote many successful paper back thrillers under a non de plume of Raymond Armstrong and Mark Corrigan as well as a couple of other names.


    It seems that my whole film experience reinforced my interest in Photography, which became my career.


    (The Girl Who Couldn't Quite is a 1950 British drama film directed by Norman Lee and starring Bill Owen, Elizabeth Henson and Iris Hoey.[1] It is based on a play by Leo Marks, with its title thought up during a conversation he had with Noor Inayat Khan.)
     
  16. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

     
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  17. Sanjeev Nanda

    Sanjeev Nanda Active Member

    Terry, this is a delightful piece of memory that you have shared with us. I'm pretty sure you were always inclined towards the form and mastery that comes with the art of film-making - your alumni were positive encouragements in that regard. In recent times. I guess the industry was a little more intimate than it is now. I had to literally Google Petula Clark right now :D imagine sitting next to this beauty back in the day.! and back in the day, the lines of genre were not drawn yet.This genre loyalty of today has only alienated potentially interested audiences from ever experiencing a a movie that they would've enjoyed otherwise.
    Once you love a medium so much, as you did to movies, one tends to generally reach a genesis, where nothing seems to amaze them, because they have seen everything. One tends to patronize their interests to a fault. Although, I'm happy that you picked up photography soon after. One thing I admire about particular movies (like 2001 A space odyssey, in question) is that they emphasize the value of a "SHOT", so that still image conveys what the entire scene has to say. In that regard, having an admiration for the medium of film-making, brings out the true heart behind the intent of photography.
    ~Sanjeev Nanda
     
  18. Sanjeev Nanda

    Sanjeev Nanda Active Member

    You know what, I'm actually going to hunt out this version of "The Seven Samurai", and watch it - since your last recommendation was so on point! Thanks in advance
    As for the 'Bambi-gate' (which it will be referred to as henceforth :p ) I can imagine the discretion you must be exercising in the cinema-hall. That being said, I don't think 95% of Bambi's target audience, and 49% of the audience in the theater at that moment, truly appreciated the gravity of the scene! Also, thanks for letting me know that Ms. Bunny was based on someone in real life - I had to google this one as well! And damn... Disney amazingly did manage to emulate the vintage beauty for the medium of animation perfectly.

    You can count on the head of a needle, the amount of regard I have for Film rating boards. If they were so prevalent back in the day, So many movies we retroactively think of, watching as adults, would never have been possible otherwise. I don't think children look at movies the way that adults do. Unless there is nudity or violence, I don't think a movie rating scheme can do anything to aid the audience.
    ~Sanjeev Nanda
     
  19. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    Film rating boards are there to enable potential viewers to avoid being offended or upset, which only works as long as they take notice of the ratings and understand them. In the 1990s (I think) the BBFC carried out a survey of some kind about film and DVD ratings, and the conclusion was that 'most people' wanted much tighter controls over films rated as suitable for children (hence the concerns about 'Bambi' and 'The Searchers'), but expected '18' rated films to be intact. This is why you will never see a complete version of 'Raiders Of The Lost Ark' unless you saw a cinema print on its original release (as I did), but can also see a complete version of 'The Wild Bunch' on DVD. However, as the BBFC website shows, cuts are still sometimes made to films rated '18' to obtain a certificate for UK cinema release. These cuts are sometimes for unexpected reasons - this is an example of a 1970s film that was only granted an '18' rating in 1991 after an 'edit' was made, which is the version my wife and I travelled 20 miles to see at the time. The BBFC website does count the 'edit' as a cut because the shot has been cropped instead...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_the_Realm_of_the_Senses
    https://www.bbfc.co.uk/releases/lempire-des-sens-realm-senses-1976

    After seeing Ken Russell's film 'The Boyfriend' (his 'U' certificate version of a stage musical set in the 1920s), I recommended it to my mother who always preferred 'nice' films. Of course, she forgot the film's title and only remembered 'Ken Rusell'... so when 'The Devils' was released she went to see it. Her opinion? Everybody else at the cinema was much younger than her, and wasn't the Abbess a bitch? After that I never recommended a film to her again. Many years later, when I read that the BBC had got the 'rights' to 'The Devils' for TV transmission, but were concerned about showing it, I telephoned them BBC and spoke to their 'Head of Film Procurement' and suggested transmission after 11 pm with the usual warning. I also suggested that he could ask the Director if a brief documentary about the historical context of the film's plot could be shown first. A few weeks later this is what happened, and the world didn't end and normal life continued.

    I assume that today it would be impossible for a member of the public to call the BBC and discuss something like this with a senior person: facile comments on Facebook probably have more influence.
     
  20. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Ah, anyone remember the Red Triangle films on Channel 4?
     

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