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slr - some help please!

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by bek, Sep 6, 2005.

  1. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    At that time we were expected to spend time in workshops and reading resistor colour codes without good colour vision isn't recommended. Likewise the multicoloured spagetti we call wiring.

    Any way that was what they wanted, one guy who was colour blind was told he would be Airframe-Engine.
     
  2. ermintrude

    ermintrude Hinkypuff

    But they both hit the physical/"mental" membrane... dude, you should really come round to my place
     
  3. jchrisc

    jchrisc Well-Known Member

    Hi Geoff - you made an absolute statement with which I couldn't agree, "that colour vision does not deteriorate with age" and then (possibly) qualified the statement with an age range.

    Seven years ago I had cataract operations and was in the situation for about two months of seeing through one eye that had been operated upon and the other that had not. The difference in colour vision between the two eyes was enormous. Objects that appeared white to the corrected eye were a pale lemon yellow to the uncorrected one. Before the operation, I had been quite unaware that I had, in effect, a pale yellow filter in each eye.

    I was told by the opthalmologist that this lens discolouration is common in older people and tends not to be noticed because one has learned to recognise what is white and the brain accommodates.

    On the basis of my own experience therefore, I can't accept that colour vision does not change with age, but I do accept that the onset of change may well occur at an age later than fifty.
     
  4. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Chris, by starting "I understand" I did not intend to make an absolute statement merely to indicate what I thought I knew. The ages quoted are simply the age at which it was determined that I had "perfect" colour vision and my age now, the limit of my experience.

    I appreciate your reply, by colour vision we generally mean the ability to destinguish colours. The most common form of colour vision defect is if I remember correctly, "Blue/Green colour blindness" meaning an inability to destinguish blue from green. If you can do this at, say, 16 I believe, and your experience seems to confirm, that you have the ability for life. The cateract did not affect this ability as your colour vision returned to normal after the operation.

    I will happily accept that I didn't make the point very clearly, please accept my apologies for any confusion.
     
  5. ermintrude

    ermintrude Hinkypuff

    99% of colour blindness is Red/Green and it is genetic (thats why it affects men far more than women) so is like it for life, it won't "get better". But there are many other reasons why your colour vision might be distorted, which are not genetic and can come on at any point in life, and also might be cured.
     
  6. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Thanks Erm, I think that is what I was trying to say. My point was that you won't suddenly loose the ability to destinguish, red/green (I said Blue/Green XX Wrong).

    Thanks again
     
  7. ermintrude

    ermintrude Hinkypuff

    Does that mean I will always be pink? :(
     
  8. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I don't know, but if you are I will be able to tell.









    What colour would you like to be?
     
  9. ermintrude

    ermintrude Hinkypuff

    I think pink is nice actually...it matches the grass...
     
  10. frank1

    frank1 Well-Known Member

    Yes men have 3 thingies in their eyes and women have 4 and thats why women can't have colour blindness sad eh!! I'm sure someone will tell us what the thingies are
     
  11. ermintrude

    ermintrude Hinkypuff

    I don't know what these 'thingies' are :D :) But ladies can be colour blind, just much rarer than men...
     
  12. Fen

    Fen The Destroyer

    I dunno about the Erm, you looked a bit <span style="color:green">green</span> the other night ;)
     
  13. Fen

    Fen The Destroyer

    Speaking as someone who is colourblind...

    You'll find that more people with blue, green or grey eyes are colourblind than people with brown eyes!
     
  14. frank1

    frank1 Well-Known Member

    The thingies I refer to were mentioned on a sky tv programme brainiac when its repeated I'll find out what the thingies are suppoose one could ask an optition
     
  15. 0

    0 Guest

    Opticians know about lenses, not eyes.
     
  16. robertj

    robertj Well-Known Member

    What is physical/"mental" membrane and who hits it? Thanks.
     
  17. Brian

    Brian Venerable Elder

    But the technical definition of colour blindness is simplistic to say the least. It is a basic test of the ability to 'see' the difference between certain basic colours.

    My wife and I are in the process of re-decorating our lounge. Neither of us are colour blind, but we have got close to having punch ups trying to match swatches of paint against those for material in side by side comparisons. And as for a persons ability to 'remember' colour, forget it. Just try going down to the outfitters to buy a pocket square without taking the shirt or tie.
     
  18. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    You too eh Brian? I never said that everybody saw colour the same, I wouldn't dare. My point, probaly wrong as Erm seems to know far more than I do, was that you won't see some thing as Red today and Green tommorrow, unless someone repaints it over night.

    Any way what has this to do with SLR's I have lost the plot!!
     
  19. robertj

    robertj Well-Known Member

    Maybe we do not exist at all, and individual objects in reality (which may not exits either) are merely a matter of convention, we are only a pile of atoms (and other micro particles) and that greater entity we call oneself is only an illusion. Nothing to do with matching and memorizing colours, I know, but I can vaguely recall that my computer keyboard is of whitish colour (the more dirty it becomes the more grey it appears).
     
  20. frank1

    frank1 Well-Known Member

    colour is in the eye of the beholder
     

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