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Secure code for all your pin numbers

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Stephen Rundle, Aug 16, 2020.

  1. SqueamishOssifrage

    SqueamishOssifrage Well-Known Member

    If the merchant considered the card to have been defaced in any way by the writing, then they are entitled to refuse it completely.
     
    Derek W likes this.
  2. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Good point!
    Also worth considering is that a Chip and Sign option may exist.
     
  3. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    TBH the way you have written that makes you sound rude too. Your response may well have upset her. Why was she stupid? Big mistake to talk to you like that? I can imagine you may well be the customer facing workers worse nightmares.
     
  4. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle In the Stop Bath


    It was, in a loud voice (not normal speaking " You do realise you are not allowed to write on these cards don't yo"

    therefore RUDE

    Thanks GR
     
  5. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle In the Stop Bath


    There would have been No response if she had not begun the problem. correct ;)

    Who's business is it what someone does as long as it does not affect (or is it effect) the legality of a debit/credit card.

    Oh and she was told that by her sup[supervisor
     
  6. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    Does your autism make you more susceptible to the feeling that someone is being rude, when in fact they are not and I or anyone else may not read it that way? Genuine question.

    Poor skills from the supervisor if she told the lady that she was wrong in front of you and presumably others.
     
    Zou, MJB and EightBitTony like this.
  7. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    Cards that have been defaced in anyway can be declined. Also any card that has not been signed. At the banks request they can also retain the card. My wife has worked in our local supermarket for the best part of two decades, a big chunk of that time on customer services dealing with complaints. Ignorant customers who demand to see the manager at the slightest issue etc. are ten-a-penny. Invariably the customer behind them in the queue is less than complimentary about their behaviour.
     
  8. MickLL

    MickLL In the Stop Bath

    Sorry - you thought it was what?

    Convention has it that you would start with zero and end with 9 - hence my thought that you had made a mistake.

    MickLL
     
  9. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    See post 18
     
    RogerMac likes this.
  10. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle In the Stop Bath

    No, according to the bank you can write even a phone number on the back in case you lose it, though I would adviser against it

    I check before I do anything as I have wrongly been told I am wrong too many times.
     
  11. John King

    John King Well-Known Member

    I carry a card with a series if dots/dashes typed on. These represent figures 1 to 10(0) in Morse code but not in the normal numerical sequence. The actual cards are represented by letters. Not even my partner knows what they are! I used to be able to type Morse at 25-30 wpm and like riding a bike, you never forget - just get slower.
     
  12. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    I've found nothing the beat my Navajo code-talker. He will even carry my bags for me.
     
  13. SqueamishOssifrage

    SqueamishOssifrage Well-Known Member

    Er... what's wrong with just remembering the damn things? And anyway, there's usually what I call a rhythm to the numbers to help. For instance, on one of my cards the first two digits form a number that is the product of the last two digits, and on another, the sum of the first, second and third digits is equal to the last digit. I have another one that is a four digit prime.

    Easy as falling off a log (to base e, naturally).
     
  14. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    All of mine have the same code. My wife’s are also the same code. They are not written down anywhere. Never forgot them.
     
  15. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I can accept that some people have difficulty remembering which PIN goes with which card but equally the easiest answer is to restrict the number of cards you use. That isn't always possible either. I remember one day arriving at a security gate at work and having a complete blank on which PIN I needed to open the gate, of course I can remember it now.

    Much better not to have a written record of any PIN if at all possible and using the various, published, memory techniques is safer and more secure.
     
  16. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    I only have a couple of cards to worry about - both have the same pin. It, and any other numerical passcodes are based on an ID number I was given in my first job and have never forgotten.
     
  17. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    Many numbers in our lives never change
    like NI numbers health numbers or military service numbers. it is easy to use them as a base for most things.
     
    Geren and RogerMac like this.
  18. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    My old warrant number is the basis of a lot of my passwords
     
  19. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    I am lucky in that I can remember four digits numbers easily so mostly I just leave them on the original that the bank sent. However I must point out that spycraft works by putting together a number of facts and telling the world that one used a substitution cypher is halfway to publishing the codes online.

    Edit
    Of course the clever trick would be tell the world that one used a substitution cypher and then use one based on square roots perhaps. I wonder if that is part of the cunning plan.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2020
    MJB, Benchista and Geren like this.

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