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seascapes

Discussion in 'Exhibition Lounge' started by Dan S, Aug 15, 2020.

  1. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    It’s a seascape when the tide is in (Walton again)

    [​IMG]BV9R0103.jpg by Pete, on Flickr
     
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  2. Dan S

    Dan S Well-Known Member

    Where is that taken from Pete?
     
  3. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Down the road at Clacton, not really a seascape but I like it.

    [​IMG]DSCF1494.jpg by Pete, on Flickr
     
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  4. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I think it is from walking the cliff top toward Frinton as far as you can go before the steps down. Is a while ago. My mother had a flat in seaview heights but the state of the roads made walking too difficult. Shame really. View from the communal garden with longer lens.

    [​IMG]274A0364.jpg by Pete, on Flickr
     
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  5. Dan S

    Dan S Well-Known Member

    Nice spot to live. Those are all really lovely shots Pete, I love the one of clacton
     
  6. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Lovely place to live if you are mobile. She wanted to move there with Dad and did so after he died but it isn’t the place to be if you have mobility problems, the pavements are terrible, absent in places and gradients are steep. I was appalled at the reality when I first went there. Shame we had to sell up. Not an easy drive from Chester though!

    Thank you for your nice words. The Clacton day was blowing a gale!
     
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  7. Dan S

    Dan S Well-Known Member

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  8. Dan S

    Dan S Well-Known Member

  9. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    Four more 'seascape' images from by back catalogue (sadly, I've not been anywhere near the sea since May 2019).

    Checking if the horizon is level.jpg

    IMGP2315B 1000.jpg

    Low tide (1).jpg

    Shades of blue (1).jpg
     
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  10. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Well-Known Member

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  11. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    The lightning shot is great, but what caused the red cast in the foreground?

    This is not a criticism, but if these were mine I would rotate the images to make sure that the horizon was level on 'Kite surfing with windfarm' and 'Sea worker at sea'. I find sloping horizons on water distracting, but other people may believe it adds to the drama.
     
  12. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Well-Known Member

    I think the red foreground is from low pressure sodium lighting (though I'm not sure why it['s shifted so much from the usual orange)

    Sorry about the horizons. I had spotted it on the sea worker shot, but if I try updating it on Flickr it looses all the links and there's no way of telling where I've posted them :(
     
  13. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    No need to apologise - sometimes I have found that a rotation of less than 1 degree is all this is needed to make a shot look 'right'. If I need to correct my shots, it's only after examining them closely. Also, the smaller the screen used to display them the less obvious it is.

    But if you get a large print done, always check first because even a 'slope' of a fraction of a degree look enormous on a print 2 or 3 feet wide. The ability to correct something like this is one of the benefits of digital I really appreciate, after over 30 years of taking Kodachrome slides. I still have a 24 x 36 inch Cibachrome print done by Jessops 20 years ago of a wide angle shot with a sea 'horizon', and am still amazed that it is dead level (no correction possible when the print was done).
     
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  14. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Absolutely. I have also found that the superposition of a level on the viewfinder to be slowly improving my ability to hold a camera straight. I had mixed feelings about using it at first, on the Fujis it is a solid green line right across the middle that takes a lot of ignoring. So user sequence is to get the camera level then compose. I mainly notice using my Canon, where the horizon aid is a more subtle black and in a corner of the frame. Here the sequence is compose then check level. I often get surprised at finding that I’m actually holding it quite straight!
     
  15. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Well-Known Member

    I have to admit I have a level in the viewfinder of the camera that took the seaworker. It wasn't a rush shot so I have no excuse at all there - spotting it in post SHOULD have happened any way, but it's not something that bothers me at small tilts 5 degrees does bother me, not enough for a deliberate dutch tilt, yet too much to escape even a quick glance.
    As no doubt you've noticed post processing is not one of my strong points!
     
  16. Dorset_Mike

    Dorset_Mike Grumpy Old Fart

    I found the easiest way to see and correct horizons was Picasa, which could superimpose a grid on the image and a slider control to rotate the image to align horizons or verticals with the grid. Do any other image processing packages have a similar option? On Picture Publisher you get a "Rotate image" option but have to enter degrees clock or anticlock, which often takes 2 or 3 guesstimates. In this pair of screen captures I could have used a degree or two more!

    horiz1.jpg

    horiz2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2020
  17. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I think they all do
     
  18. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    PS has a spirit level. Link one end of the line to the other end at it puts the image straight. Very simple to use.
     
  19. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    No I hadn't noticed anything systematic about your post-processing.

    I tend to always check horizontal/vertical because in the past I used to have tilt in every picture. I'm also obsessed by keystoning to the extent that I bought a shift lens to mitigate the cases where it is unavoidable with a normal lens. I'd say that, although I'm better than I used to be, I correct more often than not for rotation in the horizontal or vertical (or both). I only save RAW files and every kept image will get opened in Lightroom at some point for editing.
     
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  20. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    My ancient copy of Photoshop Elements 7 lets me superimpose a grid on an image, and also adjust the separation of the lines of the grid, so then rotating the image is easy and quick to do. However, after the rotation the image will require cropping, How much this is will, of course, depend on the amount of rotation.
     

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