1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. REMINDER

    Any content, information, or advice found on social media platforms and the wider Internet, including forums such as AP, should NOT be acted upon unless checked against a reliable, authoritative source, and re-checked, particularly where personal health is at stake. Seek professional advice/confirmation before acting on such at all times.

Reasons to be Cheerful.

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by MJB, Mar 14, 2019.

  1. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Did you hit escape?
     
    Catriona likes this.
  2. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    If he was an ex-marine he probably tabbed out of there...
     
  3. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Not in control?
     
  4. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Pause for a second and return after
     
  5. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    I remember when I was working as development system admin on a Dec Vax cluster when one of our members left for another project. Turned the keyboard of his VaxStation over and gave it a shake. Got about half a pound of orange scented dried breadcrumbs and bits of dried egg mayonnaise. Guess what he had for lunch at his desk every day.

    Mind you, the keyboard worked fine - I think they used a membrane system, which was waterproof and so on.
     
    Catriona likes this.
  6. Footloose

    Footloose Well-Known Member

    Didn't some of the Mainframe and Mini-computer companies use a lot of the original BBC microcomputers as terminals?
     
  7. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    He should have put the number lock on. :rolleyes:
     
    Catriona likes this.
  8. neilt3

    neilt3 Well-Known Member

    I don't know about a spelling mistake , bloody Motorola predictive text !
    Many a text I've sent contained a random jumble of words .

    Should probably proof read better before pressing post or send .
     
    Catriona likes this.
  9. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Yes, easy. But Lesley has found one that works. One five star review from Lesley on here beats a million fake reviews on Amazon.
     
    John Farrell likes this.
  10. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    But it was brilliant. I can imagine a 2 m cue (measuring stick) becoming a national symbol.
     
    Zou likes this.
  11. neilt3

    neilt3 Well-Known Member

    Well I did suggest a while back we should all carry a sharpened stick to help enforce social distancing from the numpties that still can't figure it out and get to close .;)
     
    Zou and Catriona like this.
  12. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    There’s your cue!
     
    neilt3, Catriona and MJB like this.
  13. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Not something I came across in any of the places I worked. To be honest, why would you give something like that to staff? Hand over a proper terminal and all they need to know is where the power switch is and how to log in. Give them a general purpose computer for the same job and you'll have increased your training costs and made a nice whippy rod for the support staff's collective back.
     
  14. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Where I worked the first adoption of the PC (IBM XT) was for use as a terminal emulator for the mainframe and later as a wordprocessor . They were cheaper than the dedicated terminals, most of which were end of life with horrendously burned screens, and probably cheaper than the IBM displaywriters that the secretaries were using. There wasn’t really any concept of them being “computers”, all the computing was done on the mainframe. It was good having a terminal at your desk rather than having to book a slot on the proper terminals which were housed in dedicated and pokey little rooms - just enough room for one person and a chair. It was the arrival of Lotus 123 that signalled the change in emphasis away from the mainframe to the desktop computer as non-programmers could start to do some basic calculations.
     
  15. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Yes indeed. I worked at a few places where that happened. The difference was that the XTs were supplied with boot disks that booted into the appropriate emulation and keyboards that included all the terminal specific keys. I actually sat in at a procurement meeting where the reps made it quite clear that the XTs were not being sold as computers but "could be adapted to other purposes" when required. ;)
     
  16. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Ah, the fun we had trying to source APL keyboards for IBM PS/2s! :rolleyes:
     
  17. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    Haven't a bloody clue what you're on about, but if that's fun you need to get out more ☺
     
    DaveM399, dream_police and Zou like this.
  18. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    You haven't lived until you've tried using APL on an ordinary keyboard.

    Wait a minute! Shouldn't that be "You had a life until you tried using APL"? :confused:
     
  19. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Yeah, that sort of thing should come with a (Mental) Health Warning.

    APL was great for prototyping and quick-and-dirty solutions to one-off problems. So, of course, the place I was working at decided to write a massive budgeting system in it... o_O:rolleyes:
     
  20. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Just messaged my brother who is an ex IT nerd. He told me to laugh at that:)
     
    dangie and Catriona like this.

Share This Page