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Olympus Trip 35 or Yashica Minister III?

Discussion in 'Everything Film' started by Kitchen10, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Actually, I've just thought - have you got a mobile telephone? If so, you should be able to get an app for it. I've got a free one called Metero on the Nokia. This is using Windoze, but I'd guess there are others available. Works quite well, even better when I remember to put the 'phone in my pocket.

    S
     
  2. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Steve, all the advice I've had was the opposite. Don't leave the selenium meter shut away. Expose it to daylight - good daylight - at least once a year if possible.

    I could understand the advice about not leaving it exposed especially to strong sunlight for long periods of time. Camera left for days on a table by a window with sunshine streaming through onto the lens front or meter cells, for instance. The other advice is to not let a selenium meter get wet. Cheers, Oly

    Cheers, Oly
     
  3. 0lybacker

    0lybacker In the Stop Bath

    Buying a really good meter is something of an investment. Maybe exercise a little patience and save up for something good?

    If I was buying now, I'd go for a budget meter, a Sekonic L-308S which has a normal street price of £130-£140 new but can be available for £110-ish. It would do what I need, measure flash as well, has no bells & whistles but runs on an AA battery.

    Be careful to ask about batteries when buying older s/h meters & check the compartments. The Gossen Lunasix has a good reputation but may require a discontinued battery. Ffordes have a couple for £49.
     
  4. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Sorry, Oly, that's what I meant but as usual didn't make clear. Use it, but cover when not in use!

    S
     
  5. Sejanus.Aelianus

    Sejanus.Aelianus In the Stop Bath

    I owned a pair of Lunasixes (OK, one was the Profisix labelled version) at one time but parted with them when I realised I was pulling out the Weston to check their readings! I never found any meaningful differences but sometimes you just take against a tool and it's time to let someone else play with it...

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2015
  6. AlexMonro

    AlexMonro Old Grand Part Deux

    The Sekonic L-208 is the bottom of the range and seems to work fairly well for reflected and incident readings down to 3EV at ISO 100. Various Amazon & eBay sellers seem to have them at around £60. You might even find one second hand.

    It uses a silicon photodiode powered by a lithium coin cell (provided) - mine's still going strong after 2 years.
     
  7. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    I've had a number of cheapo meters, but a number of decent ones, too.

    Cheapest decent one is a Euromaster II I got for £4 - boxed. It's a wonderful meter, very accurate in normal light levels. I also have an elderly Pentax Spotmeter V that read out by 2 stops when I bought it and for several years, but now, for some reason, is spot on. Sorry.
    I have a Lunasix F - takes a 9V PP3 type battery, is again very accurate but is a bit big. This has a "spot" attachment that makes it pretty versatile, but a bit bulky. I have a Gossen Digisix that is lovely and small, but again accurate - it goes landscape shooting with me because it takes up very little space or weight.
    And finally, a Sekonic 308S which is purely used as a flashmeter, but is probably perfectly capable.

    If I'm shooting with a classic, it's the Weston that gets the gig. Just seems right, and is such a nice tool to use.
     
  8. Kitchen10

    Kitchen10 Well-Known Member

    I've tried a few and they're all a few stops out :(
     
  9. Kitchen10

    Kitchen10 Well-Known Member

    I'd just rather not take the risk. CdS meters seem more stable over time - bear in mind that selenium meters tend to be older (and often more abused). Time is rarely kind to older meters as far as I can see - I've never found an accurate selenium meter (other than that of the Yashica, which is fine in normal light) in the wild.
     
  10. Kitchen10

    Kitchen10 Well-Known Member

    Thanks. I'll probably save up for a new meter. I avoid mercury cell powered devices like the plague!
     
  11. Kitchen10

    Kitchen10 Well-Known Member

    How can I tell if a Weston is accurate? I've seen plenty floating about, but they are all around the £15 mark and I don't want to spend money on an inaccurate meter that I can't use! Also, how easy are Westons to use?
     
  12. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Easier than the Yashica!
    Point at whatever, press the button, match the number on the meter to the number on the dial and read off the result. After you've set the film speed, of course.
    Also, if you pull down the little door on the business side, it opens up more cells for use in low light situations.
    Accuracy? Have you got a digital camera? If so, check it against that.

    If it is out, you should be able to have a good guess by how much after checking the first film. Then set the film speed [probably] slower by a stop or two.

    S
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2015
  13. Kitchen10

    Kitchen10 Well-Known Member

    OK. I'll bring along a digital camera when I go shopping!
     
  14. Kitchen10

    Kitchen10 Well-Known Member

    What is the difference between incident and reflected light, and how do you know which to use?
     
  15. Sejanus.Aelianus

    Sejanus.Aelianus In the Stop Bath

  16. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member


    incident light is the light falling onto a subject. Measure the intensity of this and you can set the exposure independently of the reflectivity of the subject. So a black cat will be black and a white cat white. Perfect!

    Reflected light is what a camera measures. If the overall reflectivity of the subject differs from the calibration point of the camera meter then over or under exposure will ensue. For this reason it is necessary to use exposure compensation according to the nature of the subject in its background. Modern meters also sense variation in brightness across the frame to try to recognise typical scenes.

    To measure incident light accurately you have to be in the subject position from the camera side. This is OK if you are making a portrait from close up, but is more problematic for landscapes or sport or pretty much anything. You can make a reflected light measurement from any distance.

    A hand held meter will I think always make an incident reading. It may or may not allow reflected light metering - usually by means of a variable angle spot measurement.
     
  17. Kitchen10

    Kitchen10 Well-Known Member

    Thanks. That's really cleared a lot of things up :D.
     
  18. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Well no - as they stand, handheld meters generally measure reflected light. You have to fit (or slide over) a diffuser to take an incident reading - the Invercone, in the case of a Weston, often missing, but basically a domed diffuser to pick up light from several directions, which is what you need for a three dimensional subject.
    The Sekonic 308, for example, has a sliding diffuser for normal incident use, plus a separate flat disc for incident readings for flat artwork.
     
  19. Kitchen10

    Kitchen10 Well-Known Member

    So is an invercone for reflected light readings? Also, what does water do to selenium cells?
     
  20. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the correction, I was thinking only about diffuser in place which is the only way I have used a 308 ( it was missing the other bit) and I px-ed for a L-508 which has a fixed dome and spot meter.
     

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