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Not strictly photographic but................

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by swanseadave, Sep 29, 2021.

  1. swanseadave

    swanseadave Well-Known Member

    My sons recently bought me a pair of compact binoculars 12x25 of Chinese manufacture

    I`m really pleased but I have great difficulty in holding them steady at 12x magnification.

    It`s similar to holding steady a long lens without support but far more pronounced.

    Anyone any idea to mitigate the problem please?
     
  2. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    I don't know of any way to make hand-holding binoculars easier. I can only suggest using them on a tripod - not ideal, of course.

    IIRC, the tripod mounts that I've seen range from about £10 to £25.
     
  3. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    Answers should be pretty much the same as for telephoto lenses, tripod/monopod, beanbag or any kind of firm support on which to rest you arms or the binoculars...
     
    RogerMac and daft_biker like this.
  4. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    That's a lot of magnification for bins. Most are 8x. In camera terms that would be something like holding a 600 mm lens. Keep your elbows in, try to lean on something.
     
    RogerMac likes this.
  5. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    The problem is you have a very high magnification (equivalent to handholding a 600mm lens without IS!!) added to this the front objective at 25mm is small. I’m guessing these are fairly light??

    Other than building yourself a parallelogram mount (which I am currently constructing myself) the other alternative is rest your elbows on a solid object when viewing, ( car roof, wall etc etc)

    Edit: sorry Pete only just seen your reply above - Doh!!
     
  6. swanseadave

    swanseadave Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the replies.
    I suppose it`s fairly obvious now I think about it.It had occcurred to me
    that a mono/tripod would work.
    I needn`t really have asked should I?:rolleyes:

    Pixel puffin,you`re right,it is very light.When focussed the image is circular.
    I`ll have to use it where I can rest my elbows in future.
    For the time being I`m just watching the birds at the feeders.Bluetits look huge!!:)

    Sorry for appearing thick!!!

    Thanks,Dave.
     
    peterba likes this.
  7. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    If you don't know you don't know.

    Bins for birdwatching are usually low powered and a balance between giving some magnification and a decent field of view. Spotting scopes are used for large magnification and these need to be on a good tripod base. The designation is magnification x exit lens diameter in mm. The larger the latter the better the bins are in low light. My bins are 8x42 and I can't hold them very still. "Big" bins would be 10 x 50. Like big lenses, weight can make them more stable to hold IF you are in position with good support. The weight also forces you to find something to rest on. High magnification and light weight like 12x25 I'd imagine to be really difficult to hold still.

    The image will be circular when the separation between the two eyepieces is correct for you. Bins are usually hinged to allow the separation to change.

    To set the bins. One eyepiece (usually the right one) will have an adjustment marked +/-. Set the adjustment to 0. Close that eye. Focus with the main wheel on something in the middle distance until the image is sharp with the open eye (say left). Now reverse the process (open (right )eye, close (left ) eye) but leave the focus as it is. Turn the adjustment piece until the image becomes sharp with the (right) eye. Check with both eyes open - the image should be at maximum sharpness. If you wear varifocals try to position the eyepieces to the upper part of the lenses (distant view).
     
  8. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    Although it’s not related to this thread, I’ve read many stories on the web where birders and astronomers have given up and moved over to IS binoculars.
    I’ve always fancied a pair, but geez they are so expensive!!
     
    RogerMac likes this.
  9. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Must admit that I. moved over to IS and am happy with the result.
     

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