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Not for the first time...

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by MJB, May 11, 2021.

  1. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Them sheeps was goats.



    S
     
    Catriona likes this.
  2. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Oh yeah? Try looking at it from here. Bloody rough comes to mind.

    S
     
    John Farrell, Zou and Catriona like this.
  3. LesleySM

    LesleySM Well-Known Member

    In reality in the 18+ years I have worked in hospitals I have never seen any system that could find a patient by their NI number. Probably 2 different databases in 2 different departments

    When my company was arranging jabs because I did not know my NHS number and could not access the "spine" to find it I wasn't going to get it even though I've worked there for nearly 3 years and they have my NI number

    Luckily one of the Trust managers with common sense (rare but not unknown) went he heard about it asked me to email him my full name, DoB and address and went onto the "spine" and sent it back to me in 2 minutes or less
     
  4. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

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    Catriona, spinno, AndyTake2 and 2 others like this.
  5. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

  6. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Without wanting to support the idea of national identity cards, is positive identification of voters such a bad idea? It was reported that, at previous elections, personation was common in some areas. It may not be widespread but, unless it is tackled quickly, it could become so. Photographs on credit cards was suggested some years ago, probably dropped because of the increase in internet shopping, but it would have had some effect (almost certainly not that intended).

    Many people have photo ID of some sort, driving licence, passport, employer issued ID card etc. In the absence of one of those voting cared and a utility bill, or official communication to the same name and address would be a good start. The worry might be that such identification could be required elsewhere. Having carried an ID card for over 40 years I can’t really complain. Anyone with a mobile phone can be tracked easily enough and we carry those voluntarily.
     
  7. Mark101

    Mark101 Well-Known Member

    Yes, but they do cross you off the list preventing two votes in the same name and it is checked against postal votes. Personally I don't see an issue.
     
    Zou and steveandthedogs like this.
  8. Mark101

    Mark101 Well-Known Member

    I'm a regular user of hospital services and have appointments at least every three months. However, when I visit another department within the hospital I'm asked for ID, and I always refuse on the basis that I've been attending the hospital at least every three months since 2005, and if that's not good enough then I'm very sorry, but if Haematology & Oncology know me well then that's good enough. This ID nonsense is going too far.
     
    steveandthedogs likes this.
  9. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    If someone else pretends to be you and votes for the opposite party and you then turn up you have lost your vote as has the party you support. If you were required to provide photo identification, or some other acceptable identification, that could not happen.
    You probably don't use airlines much but, if you did would you want someone without appropriate authority getting onto the airfield with access to every aeroplane? I some how don't think you would and ID Cards are the means by which unauthorised access is prevented.

    Just because Haematology & Oncology know you doesn't mean that have authority to be anywhere else. Not suggesting that you personally would do anything other than accept treatment but what stops someone resembling you from pretending to be you and then accessing the department? What that person might do I don't know but are you happy to risk getting incorrect treatment because someone impersonated you or was mistaken for you?

    A hospital Haematology or Oncology department is probably not a terrorist or crime target but positive identification ensures that you get the correct treatment and that your records are annotated correctly. You may believe that they know you but they could still mix you up with another patient.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2021
    Gezza likes this.
  10. WillieJ

    WillieJ Well-Known Member

    FWIW. It is my belief that Boris wants to introduce legislation such that voters have tio priovide some acceptable form of photo ID. Presumably Passports and Photo driving liceences would be on the list. He is not as far as I know proposing to introduce ID cards. I.e. (as there is no evidence of any remotely significant level of voter fraud in the UK) he wishes to discourage poor people from voting on the cheap. Hence my earlier comment re a tax on voting. Passports cost over £70 and driving licences (in practice) a shed load more. Ruth Davidson (Baroness Whatever) was interviewed on Peston last night and found Boris' proposal utterly bizarre and a solution looking for a problem.
     
    steveandthedogs likes this.
  11. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    As someone with family in other countries I need a passport, £7 a year is cheap, but I can see that for some finding £70 up front may be a problem. I have no objection in principle but any change must not disenfranchise the poor.
     
  12. Dorset_Mike

    Dorset_Mike Grumpy Old Fart

    So what about identical twins? How would you deal with them?
     
  13. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Perhaps it comes of spending a lot of my working life working in secure environments but I do wonder what people have against being asked for identification?
     
    GeoffR likes this.
  14. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Throw them in the Tiber...
     
    Zou likes this.
  15. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Infringement of human rights...to either remain anonymous or not be associated with their employer....
     
  16. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    I have no problem with ID cards being issued to everyone, free of charge and would be happy to use those for voting ID. Using passports or driving licences is a tax on people who cannot afford passports or d.l's.
    I also spent years working in a secure environment needing id. On the other hand, I no longer have a passport, and have not got a photo d.l.

    S
     
    WillieJ likes this.
  17. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    I haven't had any form of photo ID since 1988, when I had a British visitor passport from the Post Office. In 33 years its not prevented doing anything. When I have to send my driving licence off, then I'll have to convert it to a photo one. One day I'll maybe visit my daughter in Korea and need a passport, but until such time arises I'm not getting one. I don't understand why I need a passport to fly to Edinburgh or Glasgow, but not need one to make the same journey on a train. 7/7 proved that trains can be just as tasty a terrorist target.

    I could easily obtain both a photo driving licence and a passport and finding the £100+ for it isn't a problem. I also have easy access to suitably qualified people to countersign my photos with my applications. I wonder how many people in inner-city, ethnically diverse communities could say the same.
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2021
  18. WillieJ

    WillieJ Well-Known Member

    You would make a lousy she wolf.
     
  19. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I agree with all you say. I do have a passport but I suspect it will run out soon. I have a card with my photo for free bus travel. I totally agree with your question on why do we need a passport to fly on a domestic flight. I hasten to add, that includes flights within Scotland too! No passport needed for ferry travel - and just think what a disaster that could be. Trains, coaches OK too. Just flights. I don't think the airlines have thought things through for years now. Just make the passenger suffer for less and less actual 'service' onboard or off.
     
  20. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    I tend to associate a desire for anonymity with a desire to avoid prosecution... ;)
     

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