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Nikon Speedlight alternative

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by Stephen Rundle, May 12, 2020.

  1. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle In the Stop Bath


    Top end cameras never have had flash in them, people complained when the 810 had one built in
     
  2. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I have only ever had one SLR with a built-in flash, a Fuji FinePix S2 Pro, which was based on the Nikon F80. I didn't find the flash to be terribly useful and it was far too close to the lens, as is the case with pretty much every built-in flash. Speaking personally, built-in flash is more of a disincentive to buying a camera than is video capability. About the only thing worse would be automatic built-in flash.
     
  3. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    People always find something to complain about. They don't have to use the built-in flash.
     
    ChrisNewman likes this.
  4. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Quite right, they don’t have to buy the camera either. However, a built-in flash does compromise environmental protection for the camera, can affect battery life and adds a small degree of complexity. If, in this case, Nikon were to include a menu item to completely deactivate the built-in flash I might agree with you. As it is they don’t include such an option. Additionally, the flash is plastic making for a less robust prism housing than is the case where a flash isn’t included. I think I will continue to avoid cameras with built-in flash to benefit from the better protection for the prism.
     
  5. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle In the Stop Bath


    I in fact agree, you are right, in fact it is good to have it after all as you rightly say you don't have to use it but you never know when, and to be honest I bet fewer than 5% of people even bother using it in daylight when in fact they would be better to do so, after all, we are not taking film, it costs £0 to try it
     
  6. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle In the Stop Bath


    Errr. some models do
     
  7. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle In the Stop Bath

    Actually there have been odd occasions when I have wanted a flash but my D4s has been with me and I have not had one, as in shooting a person against the light, Contre-jour ....
     
  8. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Thank you for that, I haven't come across any of them.
    I rarely shoot people and when I do it is a deliberate thing and I always have at least one flash with me.

    Overall I prefer the tougher prism housing that comes with not having a built-in flash. It is a shame that Nikon stopped equipping the top end cameras with interchangeable finders after the F5, that way we could have the choice.
     
    Stephen Rundle likes this.
  9. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    The only camera I have with a built-in flash is a Fuji XE-2. The flash is pretty weak but it has the redeeming feature of not popping up in a fixed position. It can be tilted with a finger to do bounce flash if the ceiling happens to be low enough and I wind the ISO up to 3200 or so.

    I hardly ever use flash but I did buy an EOS flash gun back in 2007 and it is useful for fill-in on the rare occasions I do portraits, otherwise known as Christmas. I also couldn’t ignore a s/h Canon ring light for the even rarer occasions I do macro. My brain can’t cope with slaving the speedlight off the ring-light which I’m sure would be useful.

    Christmas before last I bought for my wife a system of 3 Rotolite LED lights that can be used continuous or flash, mains or battery, all in a nice case with stands. She had been doing a lot of table top photography but none since so it hasn’t been properly used yet, though I think we tried to get one of the grandkids to sit still for a picture (failed) Came in a lovely Peli-case.
     
  10. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    The biggest photographic problem I have is trying to keep a huge collection of rechargeable batteries charged; 6 EN-EL18s, 12 EN-EL4s and a couple of dozen AAs, how did we get to dependent on rechargeable batteries?
     
  11. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle In the Stop Bath

    Fortunately the D4s and D810 (and other combos) use the same battery therefore I only need one battery type for both cameras

    Also, I have shot for magazines all weekend on just two batteries and gone home with spare power how would anyone use 6/12 ?
     
  12. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Cameras that use power for more than exposure metering or an efficient electronic shutter?
     
  13. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    My Nikon* doesn't have a built in flash (or Speedlight, if you'd prefer). But the external Speedlight (or flash, if you'd prefer) is powered from the camera. Which I found confusing the first time I used it.


    * Nikon-1 V2
     
  14. DaveM399

    DaveM399 Well-Known Member

    That sounds like the SB N5. I've got the SB N7 for my V1, which takes a couple of AAA batteries.
     
  15. SXH

    SXH Well-Known Member

    Yep.

    I've got the SB-N7 as well.
     
  16. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    There is a story behind the EN-EL18s that runs like this: I bought the camera with one battery of unknown provenance so I ordered a third party one as a spare, then I decided that I would get a second spare and realised that I could get a pair so I did that. It turned out that the original was showing as "New" so I had four good batteries. Then I bought a second body thinking that four good batteries would be sufficient even if the battery that came with the second body was nearing the end of its life. When I got it home and opened the box there was another third party battery inside and the one in the camera also showed as new. Hence I now have six when I really only expected to have four!

    The EN-EL4a numbers are a different matter, until I bought the second D4 we had no fewer than four D2s, an H and Xs and two X bodies, I also had two D3 bodies and my wife had a D300 with the MB-D10 so seven cameras all able to use the same battery. Now, over the years we have had four reach the ends of their lives and we had spares some genuine Nikon and some third party. When I bought the second D4 I sold the D2 bodies and a D3, obviously had to put five batteries in those cameras, I also bought my wife a second D300 and MB-D10 and two new third party batteries. As you will understand some of the EN-EL4s we have are far from new but haven't reached the ends of their useful lives hence we have about six nearly new batteries and a similar number of old but usable ones. My wife seems to get through batteries much faster than I do so having plenty can be useful. I don't expect to be buying many replacements any time soon. I also expect that around half of them will be retired soonish.
     
  17. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    That's certainly part of it but almost everything uses rechargeable batteries, phones, computers (I don't really like desk tops) iPad, iPod/s, Kindles, shavers, drills, tooth brushes... Even devices that don't have rechargeable batteries can become ubiquitous, I tried to count the number of battery powered devices we have, I lost count around the 40 mark!

    Our cameras and photographic accessories use no fewer than eight different types of battery. Life was much easier back in the 70/80s when all I needed were PX625s and SR44s. By 1987 that had risen to five types but in 1990 all I needed were AAs, lots of AAs!
     
  18. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    AAs have the advantages of being obtainable almost anywhere and they are relatively inexpensive most of the time.
     
  19. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle In the Stop Bath

    OMG :) :) :)
     
  20. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    That was my thinking when I chose the Nikon F4 over the Canon EOS1 back in 1990.
     
    Andrew Flannigan likes this.

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