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Nikon or Canon

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by Chandran, Mar 31, 2000.

  1. Chandran

    Chandran New Member

    A Nikon F80 with 28-80 and 70-300 lens costs more than a Canon EOS50E with the same set of lenses.Is there any reason why Nikon should be prefered over the Canon?How does the spot metering of the nikon compare with the partial metering of the canon? Help me decide!!!
     
  2. 0

    0 Guest

    Hi Chandran
    My name is Michael from Australia, New South Wales. I read you are thinking of getting a Nikon F 80 or Canon EOS 50E. Both camera are good
    and can meet your needs. I want to ask you and think about, why do you need a camera will it meet all your needs. To answer your question on spot metering and partial metering. The F 80 the spot metering covers 1% in the viewfinder for pinpiont reading. This is good for low light or indoor.
    The EOS 50E partial metering covers 9.5% of the viewfinder. It gives 9.5 % over the image that it is reading. Nikor lens 28-80mm has Asperical class. It minimise distortion and give sharp pictures and 70-300mm has Extra low deperssion glass ( like you would find in pro lens). It gives high contrast and good resolution.Both lens do give very good to better pictures. The Canon EF lens 28-80mm and 75-300mm are cheap because they are all class and give good pictures. The F 80 is a new camera and some of it is base on the F100. Go to a Nikon web site and read about it. The EOS 50E has been out for a few years now and go the a Canon web site. I wish you well.
     
  3. Mario

    Mario Well-Known Member

    I have been a cannon owner for 5 years and I prefer mosly to use cannon cameras. If you are thinking of getting the 50e why not consider an EOS 5. You can now get these for around £400 body only and lens kits work out even better value for money. I would recomend the EOS 5 over both the 50 and the Nikon. At the end of the day though it really comes down to personal preference.
     
  4. Mario

    Mario Well-Known Member

    I have been a canon owner for 5 years and I prefer mosly to use canon cameras. If you are thinking of getting the 50e why not consider an EOS 5. You can now get these for around £400 body only and lens kits work out even better value for money. I would recomend the EOS 5 over both the 50 and the Nikon. At the end of the day though it really comes down to personal preference.
     
  5. Chandran

    Chandran New Member

    Thank You Michael
    My main Interests are Landscapes and Macro photography, I also use quiet a bit of film on the family. I am looking for a camera which will last me a long time.I will post my final decision!!
     
  6. 0

    0 Guest

    Hi Chandren
    This is michael. I have read your notice. I too like Macro photography I have being doing it for some time. I do take photos of other things. I just want to say that both cameras are good ( F 80 and EOS 50E) My advice to you is try out both cameras and get brochures and read it or go to the websites and read about it. Think of the camera that will meet your needs for all the areas you are going to use it. I wish you well.
    Michael.
     
  7. 0

    0 Guest

    Hi Chandren
    You won't believe how much money and time I've spent on macro gear over the
    years after the "maco bug" bit. My advice: think Nikon 60mm, The new Nikon
    SB 29 Macro flash and later on add the Nikon bellows system; to get "really
    small".
     
  8. Stanmor

    Stanmor New Member

    Take in all the good advice you've received already and then go to a shop and 'play' with both of these cameras. You might take a liking to the 50E's simple dials, 'silent' lenses with full-time MF, or eye control. You might like Nikon's solid feel, or 'pop-up' grid (useful for landscapes). They're both very well featured camera's. One feature of the 50E that's rarely considered is its pseudo mirror lock-up (via its remote control) - this could be valuable for your macro work.
    As for the cost of the two it possibly boils down to age. The 50E has been around for quite a few years now - the discounts have settled in. The F80 is brand new - the price will drop after a few months.
    The most important thing though is that you're comfortable handling the camera - that the main controls fall to your fingertips. the viewfinder is clear and offers some 'relief'. Both of these camera's should meet your demands in terms of spec' for many years to come. I'd be tempted to wait a few months before going for the F80 though - sometimes the first batches of a new model have inherent problems. It might be worth keeping your ear to the ground to see what the first users of this camera have to say (and maybe a better price).
    The two lenses you've mentioned are OK for general use - you'll need a tripod for sharp pic's with that 70-300 though. They're not going to give you true macro though (1:2 at best). Many of the 28-80's are prone to quite noticeable barrel distortion and vignetting (with a filter) at the wider end. If this is your first SLR consider a 50mm - they're very cheap, sharper & contrastier than just about any other lens, and they offer an often 'pleasing' natural perspective. One of these will be perfect for shots of freinds & family - they're fast as well so you won't have to resort to harsh on-camera flash too often. Just don't get very close to someone's face as it isn't flattering. Save up for true 100'ish macro for this stuff.
    The 50E's 'spot' metering covers a rather large (9.5%?) area of the image area. It's fine most of the time though - you can easily meter from mid-tones with this and recompose. The F80 offers the more usual small spot metering - some people love this feature, others find that they compensate exposure through experience of the centre-weighted 'pattern'. How much value you place on spot metering is a matter for you to decide. It's handy but not at all vital for nailing a tricky exposure. With your macro and landscape work you may even end up using a hand-held meter for ambient readings - this can be the most reliable method of all when you have the time to use it.

    Simon S
     

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