1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Nikon D5300 Tripod, suggestions?

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by Ethanace, Apr 11, 2014.

  1. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    That's a good idea. I found my monopod easier to use with the adition of a simple Manfrotto tilting head.
     
  2. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    ^ I certainly use a monopod far more than a tripod, alright ultimately it has exposure time limitations, but where that is not an issue they have a number of advantages.
     
  3. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    And I certainly use a tripod vastly more than I use a monopod -- as, I suspect, most people do. When I say "vastly" I'd guess at a minimum of 10,000 times more. A tripod with all three legs pushed together can be used as a monopod; a monopod is... a monopod.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  4. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    I’m with Roger Hicks on this. I’m a keen walker, and have decided that if I ever want a walking pole, or pair of them, I’ll make sure it’s fitted with a tripod socket. But so far my balance and knees seem good enough to manage without poles, which I would find an encumbrance for holding my camera, or just stopping it swinging about on its strap, and I worry that I might trip over a pole!

    I have a decent carbon fibre tripod (it cost more than $200, and sadly is no longer available) that can be converted into a monopod. I also have the use of an aluminium monopod my son got cheap at an exhibition. I hardly ever use either as a monopod for photography - I find one too slow and clumsy for butterflies, etc, and a tripod better for static subjects. I sometimes take my son’s monopod when walking in summer in shorts, but that’s mainly for bashing down the nettles!

    For anyone who thinks they would like a monopod, my advice would be that a cheap one will probably be satisfactory - being a single pole, my son’s aluminium one weighs very little, and rigidity is far less of a problem than with a tripod. The only limitation with my son’s, as sold, was a device to fix the camera at angles other than 90° - I add a ball head whenever I carry it.


    Chris
     

Share This Page