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Nikon d3400 lenses advice

Discussion in 'Lens Matters' started by rafael888, Jan 23, 2018.

  1. rafael888

    rafael888 New Member

    Hi. I just bought nikon d3400 with lens 18-55 mm f/3.5-5.6
    I'm very happy with that kit but going further with photography i feel that i missing something.
    I need lens for good portreit photos/close distance photos and my favourite type - landscapes (as im travelling a lot). I've been considering to buy 24mm lens and 35mm/50mm.
    Can anyone recommend me what would be the best affordable option as i know my camera is cheap and for begginers. Will 24mm and 35mm be good choices or go for something else.
    Thank you for help
     
  2. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Use the lens you have until you can't get the photographs you want, and then you'll know what you need to fill the gap.

    Your lens already does 24, 35 and 50mm.
     
    RogerMac likes this.
  3. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I'd say the same thing. Although you will read that prime lenses are "better" than zooms you need to be sure that you will use them and be happy with the results. In the wide to normal focal lengths I only have two primes - a dedicated macro and a specialised wide-angle. I much prefer zooms generally. On my fuji CSC, which has the same sensor size as your camera, I extended the zoom range of the kit lens (18-55) by buying a longer zoom (55-200) and a wider zoom (10-24) and this covers most things short of wildlife. I don't know the Nikon alternatives but I am sure they have them. The 18-55 range is chosen by camera manufacturers for the good reason it covers most needs.
     
    RogerMac likes this.
  4. rafael888

    rafael888 New Member

    Yes but i see some example photos shot by the same camera i got one by 24mm lens( landscape was amazing) and another one by 35mm (portreit with washed out background) and i found them perfect. Cant get same effect with lens i got. Ok from the other hand- is there point to buy 35mm lens for learning occasional photo?
     
  5. Snorri

    Snorri Well-Known Member

    Well... for portraits you might want a 60mm prime, for close ups you need a macro or a reasonably good zoom landscapes, well anything goes as you get different pictures from a different view. As a Canon user we/I am lucky enough to have the excellent EF-S60mm f2.8 macro for close ups and portraits, I wonder is there a Nikkor equivalent?
     
  6. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    You have a decent doitall lens. I suggest that any further lenses be specialist. Snorri's suggestion is a good start. Nikon do a very good 60mm macro. I prefer my 105 macro for close ups but that is way to long for portraiture on a DX camera unless you are using an aircraft hanger as a studio. This https://www.camerapricebuster.co.uk/Nikon/Nikon-FX-Lenses/Nikon-AF-S-60mm-f2.8-G-ED-Micro-Lens is a very good lens and is exceptional considering the modest price. That deals with close ups and most portraits.
    For landscapes the 18-55 is fine. Normally for landscape you wll be stopping down for depth of field to the extent that the effect of diffraction is hiding the difference in quality between the kit lens and something much more expensive.
    If you had written that you wanted to photograph sports or extremely shy wildlife then I could have helped you to spend much more money.
    If you are really serious about landscapes then you could usefully expend some money on a tripod and Lee filter system.
    Many people suggest a wide angle for landscapes. Some people use mild telephoto. It all depends on your style of landscape photography which is why most photographers develop a style that uses the lenses that they already possess.
     
  7. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Those superb photos aren't the result of the lens. They're the result of the photographer.
     
    Snorri likes this.
  8. Snorri

    Snorri Well-Known Member

    Indeed Tony, of my best moments as a photographer was when people here actually liked my photos. Not that it happens very often... Still I like to enjoy the ones I get right.
     
  9. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

     
  10. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

     
  11. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Practice! I won't deny that you can see the difference between a low cost lens and a top lens (there wouldn't be a market otherwise) but you need to have the technique right to benefit. I don't think I've ever seen an image posted in appraisals (for constructive comment) criticised for lens quality. Generally you can only tell by pixel-peeping. Image softness is most often down to missed focus or camera shake.
     
    EightBitTony likes this.
  12. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    ^ That.
     

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