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Morrison's to ......

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by MickLL, Jan 23, 2020.

  1. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    There was an M&S Simply Food in the town where I live, it was closed, because they didn't consider it was making as much as it should, although it was profitable. IMHO a company that has lost the plot, it and it's workers are suffering the consequences. The nearest store is either 10 miles away in a city-centre or closer in a retail park, to which the quality of public transport links greatly depends on where you live. From here to access by bus is two buses or a long walk, then a bus, then another fairly long walk. The M&S is now a Sainsburys Local.
     
  2. Mark101

    Mark101 Well-Known Member


    You should try my area. There are quite a few retail jobs advertised at 4 or 6 hours per week and if you go into town by car parking is £ 2 or £3 .
     
  3. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Who decided whether to or whether not to invest in and drive e-commerce in an organisation? Was it Shelf-Stacker-Brian, or Meat-Counter-Brenda, or was it CEO-Frank. When the company goes bust, will CEO-Frank be signing on at the Job Centre and having his payments sanctioned because he's a bit late one day?

    Injustice Mike. I don't want to fight with you about it, but the pyramid of accountability is the inverse of the pyramid of impact of failure. How many senior execs screw up a company, are 'dismissed', and then move on to another 7 figure salary role somewhere else?
     
    Andrew Flannigan likes this.
  4. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    In a genuine capitalist state, limited liability organisations would be seen as criminal frauds protecting incompetent managers. However, I'm sure we'll be told that's just left wing propaganda and must be ignored. :rolleyes:
     
  5. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    The managements that were driven to it in order to survive. Etailing started with new startups like Amazon. Bricks and clicks came much later as response.

    As to how many people screw one company up and then get 7 figures at another, I need the numbers you are basing that on please. I have no idea, but people's records are very closely scrutinised and my guess is very very few. With a published annual report, there is nowhere to hide.

    But unfair, probably. The lack of penalties for failure at the higher levels makes my blood boil too. It's up to shareholders innit? They often lose bigger than all the others put together.
     

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