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Mirrorless Camera

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by gmw492, Feb 25, 2020.

  1. gmw492

    gmw492 Active Member

    Hi , I am looking at getting a mirrorless camera , been reading that they are good portable cameras not as big as a dslr and you can change lenses etc, been using a bridge camera but looking for more choice now.
    Anyone recommend a decent one as a starter entry level , I have seen the Fuji X-A5 and Sony a6000, are the lens options cheaper for the Fuji and it shoots 4K video for the odd video I could do, definitely not professional level me but looking to start off on one of these to see how I go , any advice or camera recommendations would be great,
    Thanks
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    The things to evaluate with mirrorless cameras, although I speak as someone used to DSLRs are:
    • viewfinder. Not all have one and not all are equal wrt clarity and response to moving objects.
    • Startup time - I have a Fuji X-E2 and it takes an age to wake up after it goes to sleep. I tend to trn it off and on again, is quicker.
    • Handling - same for all cameras - you have to feel comfortable with them.
    • AF with moving subjects - not all can cope.
    I like Fuji. The XF lenses are good. I have the X-E2 and an X-H1. The former is no good for action but the latter handles much like an SLR. The X-T3 is very highly regarded. I’ve not used an X-A5. No experience of Sony.
     
  3. gmw492

    gmw492 Active Member

    Thanks , yes about viewfinder that’s why I looking at the Sony a6000 rather then a5100 , yes I will have to go in to handle one, guessing jessops would be best option for more on display so will have to go into the city for that , my local curry’s on industrial estate don’t have any on show , so xr lenses fit the x-a5
     
  4. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    If I was starting from base point now I would buy Fujifilm mirrorless and live with the shortcomings for some of what I do. The XF lenses are excellent and seem well constructed, the cameras feel well made and handle well. I would advise though that any CSC you buy it would be as well to buy a model that has a separate viewfinder rather than relying on the rear screen alone. I bought an X-E3 from Ebay late last year and simply could not part with my older X-E1.
     
    gmw492 likes this.
  5. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I assume XF and the budget XC lenses fit all Fuji X cameras - I’ve not heard of XR lenses. It is always worth checking. Shame you don’t have a local camera shop. Online sales have made life very hard for retail shops.


    edit: I didn’t find a review of the X-A5 other than general consumer reviews. I don’t think it has a viewfinder. I think I’ve taken less than a dozen photos using the rear LCD, always with camera resting on a table or such like.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2020
    gmw492 likes this.
  6. gmw492

    gmw492 Active Member

    Yes sorry I meant XF lenses XR was a typing error
     
  7. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Whilst many people will tell you that the EVF (Electronic View Finder) of a mirrorless camera is the best thing since sliced bread you should really try for yourself and make sure that you can get on with it. As has been said, not all EVFs are equal and you need to ensure that the EVF and camera handling are both to your liking before committing to a purchase.
     
    gmw492 likes this.
  8. alfbranch

    alfbranch Well-Known Member

    Get yourself along to a decent camera shop and try some in the hand. What type of photography are you into?

    If you want a compact mirrorless camera look at Olympus, Panasonic and Fuji all are capable systems
    I bought the Olympus OMD E-M1 back 2014 it has had the shutter replaced but is going strong and the EVF is great IMO.
     
    gmw492 likes this.
  9. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Out of the 10 digital cameras I own only 1 is a dSLR. So yes, I like digital viewfinders...
     
  10. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    In low light an EVF can imho be preferable to an optical finder. With Fujifilm there are of course the X-Pro? series with a hybrid rangefinder type of viewfinder, which also can operate as an EVF, indeed they can only be used as an EVF beyond 60mm.
     
  11. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Just to reinforce the point about EVFs being preferable in low light and also to point out that if exposure compensation is needed the effect can be seen directly before the exposure is taken
     
    IanG1957 likes this.
  12. IanG1957

    IanG1957 Well-Known Member

    I've mentioned this before, and fully realising that I'm in a minority of one, it all rather largely dépends on what you use it for.

    I take a lot of photographs with an audience behind me - often in partial, if not total, darkness - and an EVF has the advantage (for me, in this situation) that I can see A: the scene, B: the replay without removing the eyepiece from my eye - and thus not blinding the people behind me. I can also see immediately what adjustments make to the image. Pretty neat in my view.

    But again, horses for courses.
     
  13. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Getting off topic but that is an advantage I hadn’t thought of for routing everything through the ELV.

    Personally I’d like the DSLR behaviour where the rear LCD could be used primarily for menu selection and image review while the EVF remains the viewfinder. The choices on mine are all through the rear LCD, all through the ELV or switch on eye-detect. I mostly use the latter but there are occasions when light reflecting off my glasses fools the eye-detect and I have to force ELV only.

    The advantage of seeing a “real” image reflecting the effect of exposure settings before taking the picture is the overwhelming advantage of ELVs.
     
  14. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    To balance these view points, the EVF is power hungry as it requires the sensor and finder/screen to be live. If having the viewfinder live all the time is important, taking birds or wildlife at a distance for instance, the EVF may not be appropriate. Which is why you have to try cameras before buying.
     
  15. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    For the majority of users this is simply not a problem.
     
  16. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    And also why some idiots - like me - feel they need both a DSLR as Well as a mirrorless
     
  17. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    If you selectively quote my post you may well make it look like I said it was but I didn't. As you chose to exclude the other part, I'll repeat it here.
    I would hope that it is self evident that if my statement is not applicable an EVF may well be suitable.
     
  18. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Battery life is something that you have to live with. I was appalled the first time I used my X-E2 and a spare battery was an immediate purchase, but it hasn't actually proved a problem. An advantage of ELV for birds and wildlife is that you can magnify the view. I'm still on an SLR set up for birding, and will be for sometime if this new R series camera for Canon sticks at 20 MP, but having a closer viewfinder view of a bird will make focussing much easier.
     
  19. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Of course I quoted you selectively! :rolleyes:
     
  20. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Quite, given the compact and lightweight nature of the cameras carrying a couple of spare batteries is not onerous.
     

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