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Minolta 404si 35mm film camera - Battery Life

Discussion in 'Sony Chat' started by psj23, Jun 28, 2013.

  1. psj23

    psj23 Well-Known Member

    Hello, I have a relative with a Minolta Dynax 404si 35mm SLR film camera (circa mid-to-late 1990s), along with a couple of lenses. He wants to sell it, but with this caveat: the batteries (even when new) only last, at best, 6 months in the camera - that's when the camera is switched off. After about five or six months of storage, there's not even enough power left for the LCD to display anything but a dead battery icon. He thinks something might be wrong with it. Can anyone share their experiences?
     
  2. neilt3

    neilt3 Well-Known Member

    I can't really tell you how long batteries will last left in the camera unused . There is some battery drain though . So that could be right , however , you should really remove them when not in use to avoid corrosion of contacts . With regard to selling the kit , you get more money selling the lenses individually . Depending what the lenses are , they should work fine with the current Sony alpha DSLR's and SLT's (not NEX) , all Minolta autofocus lenses are fully compatible. Some after market ones can have issues with compatibility . The camera on it's own would likely only sell for about £5 . Depending on what the lenses are , you should get a good price if in good condition.
     
  3. psj23

    psj23 Well-Known Member

    Good point about corrosion. But luckily the contacts look clean enough.

    What I really am wanting from film is almost exclusively black&white photography. My 600D is more than capable in the colour arena but there is something lacking, in my eyes, when I compare a digital black and white photo with film. To me, the film looks so much more nuanced. Analogue still shines through in certain places... And no digital post-processing required.

    Ironically, I've really been looking at those Sony SLTs with envy, but all my money's gone into Canon on the digital side. I am quite happy with Canon but it's interesting how Sony has devised a hybrid- not quite mirrorless, not quite SLR. Maybe someday when I win the lotto I'll buy one!

    So before I make any decisions about the Minolta I'll wait and see if anyone has actually left the batteries in for a long time with similar results. If my relative's experience is irregular then maybe there's something wrong with the camera's circuitry.
     
  4. neilt3

    neilt3 Well-Known Member

    I'm with you on black and white photography . I still use quite a bit of film , I have it in 100 feet rolls and load my own spools , plus developing etc . If your going to get the kit at a good price , then buying another camera such as a Dynax/Maxxum 5 would give you a more versatile camera for only £5 - £10 (or $'s) . Don't worry about batteries , you can get rechargeable ones . Be carefull though , this size of battery comes in two different voltages . If you do get something like a Dynax 5 then you can get a battery grip (BP200) that hold 4 AA batteries . Of coarse you can avoid and ignore battery drain by just removing the batteries when it's not in use .
     
  5. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Minolta af film camera bodies in general, like most others of the era have little value now, most cameras will drain batteries when left for a period, if it is going to be left standing it is advisable to remove them anyway.

    I'm with you on analogue black and white, a well produced darkroom print has an indefinable quality that digital lacks.

    The slt from Sony, Canon got there first! The Canon Pellix used a similar arrangement way back when, the downside is a poorer finder image, which the evf on Sony cameras doesn't fully overcome.
     
  6. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    What's missing in B&W is basically grain - there's nothing like it. As for SLTs, be grateful you don't have to put up with their disadvantages compared to other types of camera.
     

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