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lpl c7700 enlarger+contrast

Discussion in 'Everything Film' started by junobandw, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. junobandw

    junobandw Member

    Hi all, I recently changed to a lpl c7700 enlarger from a very basic lpl b&w one. I've found however that when I split grade print I cannot get the contrast that I am used to. I usually do 0/1 grade and then (almost) 5 grade. Is it the enlarger? I am still using RC paper, not grown up enough for the other yet! :)Any suggestions gratefully received, regards June
     
  2. taxor

    taxor Well-Known Member

    Hiya June,
    You said your LPL was a basic black and white enlarger. Was it a condenser type head? If this is the case, you'll always find that they (condenser heads) always print with more contrast than a diffuse light source such as a colour enlarger. The difference in contrast is due to an phenomenon known as the ' callier effect'. One way to combat this is to develop your films to a higher 'gamma', that is, more contrasty to compensate for the inherent softening of diffuse light sources. If you can let us know more precisely what type of enlarger you had and what you're now using, plus any other info (such as; do you use multigrade filters or dial-in filtration?) we could advise you much better. Regards, T.
     
  3. junobandw

    junobandw Member

    Hi Taxor, thanks for reply. My original enlarger was a lpl3500,the light source was just like an ordinary lightbulb and I used Kodak under the lens filters. My new enlarger has a much smaller bulb that is reflected onto the lens via a white coated chamber and the filters are dial in.Hope that's the kind of info you meant. I understand what you mean about a more contrasty neg but in the absence of one of those? If I used a higher initial filter, 0y which is 2, and then my highest which is 170m, which is roughly 4ish?Appreciate any further suggestions....regards June
     
  4. PeteE

    PeteE Well-Known Member

    I have the LPL C7700 pro with the same colour mixing head as you have described;I only put in the MAGENTA filters for use with Multigrade,don't bother to mix in the Yellow to get the smae exposure effect- I just do a test strip if I put in more Magenta. I find 170 Magenta is not up to Grade 5 Ilfospeed. You have to get a more contrasty neg to work with- if your films are OLD(as MINE are!) then you must increase the development time anyway as the film loses contrast as it gets older.
     
  5. taxor

    taxor Well-Known Member

    Could you not try using Ilford MG filters? I know it sounds a bit pointless if you have dial-in filtration, but to quote somebody else, they are more or less an industry standard and if you still can't achieve G.5, perhaps you could dial in some extra magenta. If it's any consolation, I sometimes have a similar (if reversed) problem. Using, as I do, a condenser type enlarger, I sometimes have a problem in achieving a soft enough soft exposure - if that makes sense - despite using a G.00 filter. Your suggestion about using a G.2 soft exposure sounds interesting and surely worth a try, although if I put my Mr. Sensible hat on I'm a-thinkin' it might muddy up your midtones. Then again, I might be talking moo-poo, especially as I've never tried it myself :). Let us know how it works out, regards, T.
     
  6. junobandw

    junobandw Member

    Thanks PeteE, will do a few test strips just using magenta and see how they come out. Was taught to do detail first then contrast but.....rules are made to be challenged!Will let you know how I get on, thanks again, regards June
     
  7. junobandw

    junobandw Member

    I moved up to the C7700 to avoid the whole 'filter in-filter out' palaver! Had a lot of trouble with the enlarger just moving enough to mess up the print. Could try to rig up a little yokey-me-bob just to slip my highest filter into for quick 3 sec blast at the end, I guess. Will let you know how I get on, thanks all for the suggestions. Regards June
     

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