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Lightroom Classic Profiles

Discussion in 'Digital Image Editing & Printing' started by EightBitTony, Apr 8, 2018.

  1. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    So profiles seem to have been beefed up quite a bit.



    Unlike presets, profiles are the maths used to convert the RAW data into the first rendered image, before adjustments. They have access to data beyond the sliders, and Adobe have now added creative profiles, but they've also refined the existing ones and made it easier to locate and switch them.
     
  2. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Yes, looks good... but Adobe have left the non-subscription version of LR out of the update. :( B*****ds!
     
  3. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Looks like they are copying On1. It seems to have hundreds of them. In standalone LR I tend to use the simulated Astia profile for RAF and the Adobe standard profike for CR2.
     
  4. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Yeh, I think a lot of people didn't know they were there, and the ability to do colour lookup tables offers a significant 'filter' ability which as we know, many other products have and pitch as being modern, but without the limitations of presets.
     
  5. GlennH

    GlennH Well-Known Member

    Finally they're at the top of the panel where they should've been all along. :)

    Still like my X-Rite profiles for blue skies, but they're not so good for reds (sometimes switched to Adobe Portrait for that).
     
    peterba likes this.
  6. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    I wish mine were... :( (see post #2)
     
  7. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    I still figure the price is okay for a piece of software I use every day. I appreciate people dislike the subscription approach.
     
  8. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Sadly, this is for the "classic" version, but not for the non-subscription version... for which, the latest (and presumably, final) update is v6.14.
     
  9. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    On1 sent out a user survey yesterday which I read as looking at ways to close further the gap between themselves and Adobe but it was fixated on LR classic users rather than LR 6.14 users who haven't yet gone to the subscription model. I didn't quite understand why they ignore this market segment.
     
  10. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Maybe it's tiny?
     
  11. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    I agree - that does seem strange, Pete.

    When Adobe announced that LR was switching to the subscription model, there was a widespread and very vocal on-line reaction against the idea. Presumably, in the interim, some people will have either changed their minds, or grudgingly switched to subscription despite their misgivings, but nonetheless I would imagine that there would still be a sizeable number of non-subscription LR users. One would expect On1 to jump on the opportunity, since including them in its marketing wouldn't really involve any major extra effort.

    Do you use the On1 software, and if so, how does it compare to LR, in your view?
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2018
  12. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    That's just a guess though. I presume Adobe know the numbers and don't feel it is worth chasing, and I presume that ON1 must know how many people bought their product outright in the wave of that change, and they've probably seen those purchases dry up, so how big is the market?
     
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  13. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Yes, I agree, Tony. (I would point out that I did write "I would imagine..."! ;):D)
     
  14. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I trialled the 2017 version and bought the 2018 version out of interest. On the plus side it has something that LR is very bad at and that is removing anything that isn't a dust spot - it does a context sensitive repair. As a raw processor it seems OK. It is not as easy to use as LR. You can do more with the local adjustment masks in terms of editing the masks than in LR but I haven't got so far as to use them. LR auto-mask is a bit clunky and I sometimes find you can see the edge of the mask as a white border in the final image.

    I haven't tried to use it yet but ON-1 can take the editing into a Photoshop like world where you can do things with layers. I never understood layers (gave up with Elements 7 as too hard to use).

    On1 doesn't do the publish to Flickr in the same way as LR yet, but I think this is coming. I make publish collections which map onto Flickr albums. It's a quick and easy way to have a photo index that I can access from a tablet.

    It doesn't have a polished print module yet - you can print but it doesn't look as smooth as the LR version - and I haven't tried to use it.

    I haven't seen a means to back up the central index yet, like LR does its catalogue. I'm not so interested in having the side-car files everywhere - that (together with lack of direct printing) put me off Capture One - ten or so years ago.

    So - I think it is a capable editing program but it isn't yet a LR replacement for me.

    With LR the cost of the subscription model (at least at present levels) isn't really a barrier to me although it is more than the historic upgrades to the standalone version, and I don't want Photoshop as I cannot see me wanting ever to use it. It is the direction to move everything to the cloud I am against. I'd rather have everything local. I've not got "that many" images, 340 GB is my photos album size on disk after 10 years, but I really don't want that amount of data out there - it is too big to get back if somewhere along the line the service is suspended.
     
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  15. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Thanks, Pete. An interesting and comprehensive write-up - better than many on-line reviews! :D

    I certainly agree with your comment about "moving everything to the cloud".
     

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