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Lest we forget...

Discussion in 'Exhibition Lounge' started by gray1720, Nov 11, 2017.

  1. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    steveandthedogs likes this.
  2. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Not sure where the bigotry comes in in WW1, but there certainly was a lot of misplaced chauvinism about.
     
  3. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    I'm guessing that's the site of a WWII aircraft crash, in which case bigotry had a lot to do with it.

    S

    ps Snowdonia?
     
    peterba likes this.
  4. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Mike,

    "and" can be used conjunctively or disjunctively: http://swarb.co.uk/chichester-diocesan-board-of-finance-v-simpson-hl-21-jun-1944/

    Also, a "bigot" is someone unreasonably wedded to an opinion; such as, for example, the undeniable supremacy of their own nation.

    Yes, I'm going to bring Brexit in to it. Both my grandfathers were killed at sea during WW2. The EU (initially, the European Coal and Steel Community) was set up, to a very large extent, to make war impossible (or at least, extremely difficult) between its members. In this respect it has worked for well over 60 years. Anyone who forgets this is a fool.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  5. John Worsnop

    John Worsnop In the Stop Bath

    Surely it is NATO with thousand upon thousands of USA armed forces in Europe that kept the peace. Has the EU really done much to sustain peace? They didn't do much in NI and Ireland when there was trouble between EU neighbours or in the Balkans.
    But no doubt integration of basic industries makes war less likely and the people of power in EU countries will want the status quo to be maintained so the protectionist cartel can continue to sustain their privileged comfortable lifestyles. So yes the intertwining of economic interests is, in practical terms, an aid to continuing cooperation but at a cost.
    As a matter of interest what is the factual basis for saying the Coaland Steel community was largely set up to make war between the participants less likely ? Was it written into the treaties setting up the organisation?
    Anyhow I feel the Amateur Photographer forum is unlikely to influence anyone with much political or economic clout and expressing trenchant bordering on obsessive views is unlikely to cause anyone to change their mind about the desirability of revoking article 50 - and yes everyone and his dog has known from when article 50 was triggered that it could be revoked.
     
  6. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear "John",

    Why don't you just steer clear of things you don't understand? All right, I cheerfully accept that Wikipedia is hardly an authoritative source, but this is a fair summary and saves me having to reiterate what is known by anyone with any knowledge of the subject.

    Name a war between EU members, and research the difference between wars, separatism and terrorism.

    An obsessive defence of the indefensible ain't very convincing.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
    steveandthedogs and peterba like this.
  7. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    When in the life of the EU has there been conflict between the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom?

    Which Balkan states were members of the EU during the periods of conflict?


    Why don't you read up on it here: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/ftu/pdf/en/FTU_1.1.1.pdf
     
  8. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Andrew,

    The answer to all of the questions above is the same:

    Kippers don't do facts.

    You forgot one other question, though. When has there been "trouble" (in the sense of "armed conflict") between two members of the EU?

    As I've said before, I understand that it serves only to reinforce Brexiters' convictions when you call them stupid or ignorant or both. Also as I said before, some aren't. But what else can you call the ones that are?

    Cheers,

    R.
     
    steveandthedogs and peterba like this.
  9. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Anyway to get back to the original thrust of the discussion and to misquote Crocodile Dundee "that's not a poppy - this is a poppy"...

    Fujifilm SL300 8GB 05 DSCF3623.JPG
     
    peterba likes this.
  10. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Clear, but then the second noun becomes redundant in the context.
     
  11. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Mike,

    You need to interpret the context quite narrowly for that to be true. Interpret it more widely as "war" (which is how I took it) and, read disjunctively, it reduces to

    Violence leads [or can lead] to war

    and

    Bigotry leads [or can lead] to war

    Hard to dispute, I'd have thought.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  12. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    Bugger me, that's a whopper! As the Actress said to the Bishop.

    Adrian
     
  13. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Adrian,

    I'd rather have a Bounty..

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  14. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    Right idea - it's the memorial at the crash site of the Wellington on Waun Rydd in the Brecon Beacons - I don't think any of the Snowdonia sites have this much wreckage remaining, the park authority cleared many of them in the 1980s.

    Adrian
     
  15. IvorCamera

    IvorCamera In the Stop Bath

    Yes Andrew, thats a poppy and its displayed correctly with the green leaf in the 11 o'clock position.........
     
  16. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Good grief! I didn't know there was a "correct" position. Why does it matter?

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  17. Fishboy

    Fishboy Well-Known Member

    I think I managed to beat my record this year. Pinned my poppy on at 19:10 last Monday and realised I'd lost it at 22:40 - I usually manage to go at least twelve hours before losing it.

    Cheers, Jeff
     
  18. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    There isn't a correct position. Not in the eyes of the Royal British Legion anyways.
     
    Roger Hicks likes this.
  19. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Dear Martin,

    Thanks. I'd wondered how I'd managed to live this long without ever hearing this curious factoid.

    The poppy is, after all, a symbol of remembrance it its own right. The bit about 11 o'clock sound like something made up by someone with nothing better to do.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  20. IvorCamera

    IvorCamera In the Stop Bath

    My dad was a serving soldier in the 2nd WW and so was his brother one came home the other did not we remember him every day not just on remembrance Sunday, my dad was also a standard bearer for the British Legion for many years, my dad was a very strict dad and said if you are going to do anything then do it right, he told me many years ago that the leaf should be worn at the 11o'clock position which I do, also I have never lost a poppy yet because it has always been secured properly! To all those that doubt me then why not check these facts out on google or one of the many search engines on the web.......there is also a right way and a wrong way to wear another persons medals.....we wont go into these details though!....and yes you are right Roger some people who write things on here have nothing better to do!
     

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