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Is smaller necessarily better?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by GeoffR, May 30, 2021.

  1. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    What., NOT paying the Idiot Tax? ;)
     
  2. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    Would go with Linux, but some vital software needs Win-Dross.
     
  3. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I buy used and let somebody else pay the tax!

    I get the impression, from taking one apart recently, that some laptops aren't designed to be opened and thus have a very limited life. You can at least open a MacBook, then take a look around, blow out the dust and put the cover back on because you have exhausted what the user can do. Built in obsolescence or expensive repair, a lousy choice either way.

    Not that modern computers should need repairs often. I could no more repair my Asus Switch than I could my MacBook, use what you like if it goes wrong you will have to pay either way.
     
  4. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    It's a bit like cameras, I suppose. Some people hold strong opinions unbiased by any practical experience... :confused:
     
  5. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Very wise.

    My laptop for photo use is reasonably upgradeable, by laptop standards anyway. Can't mess with the processor, but I've added an SSD to it and doubled the RAM. It has a separate graphics card - not massively powerful, but it means all my RAM is available for Photoshop etc, which helps. As a result, it's still going reasonably strong after 5 years. The HPs I'm currently using in my wife's business can all have RAM upgrades at least. I'm working to a 3 year replacement cycle for them, but they're lower-spec machines to start with. Still, they're more upmarket than when I started sorting her machines - back then, I went too cheap, which was a mistake. Now, midmarket does much better. My stuff I've taken a different approach to, buy high-end and make it last longer. Nothing lasts forever in the laptop world, although our spare home PC is over 10 years old and still works.
     
  6. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    It’s kinda scary to think of 5 year old equipment as “old”. My late-2012 imac is officially obsolete, Apple won’t touch it, so last Christmas I went to a local shop and had the HDD changed for a SSD and memory upped to 16 GB (from 8) and it’s working well for Lightroom. My “work” PC I bought for the business I started when I retired in 2015 must now be 5 years+ and I haven’t really given thought to replacing it. When I was paid to work the replacement cycle for laptops certainly wasn’t less than 5 years - seemed like forever - but they were all corporate spec HP, running custom a Windows desktop, and used ‘til they died. That wasn’t very often because they were built for longevity. The “home” PC is now woeful in its performance and should properly be replaced. I don’t know how old it is but I think it shipped with Win 8 which place it circa 2012. I’ve got a not bad laptop, bought for use on business travel which isn’t going to happen much more if ever. It’s in a drawer awaiting at least 6 months of windows updates. I should properly repurpose it as the home machine with external monitor and keyboard.
     
  7. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I have a 10.5" Philips Freevents computer in my garage for car manuals, I think it is 16 years old and running Windows XP! I can't get my Wi-Fi in the garage but that is no problem because I wouldn't use it there anyway. The battery won't hold charge and I haven't bothered to look for a replacement. I upgraded the RAM a while back from 1GB to 2GB and I wouldn't even attempt to get back inside it was that difficult. However it works and runs the software that is on it reasonably well. The other day I found a 2008 15" MacBook Pro that we had replaced and that too still works fine, not sure about the battery though. My iMac was bought new in 2011 and has user replaceable RAM (currently 12GB) and a 500GB hard drive. I don't thing any of those owe us anything. I actually use the Philips for work for a few years because, being mine rather than a company machine, I could run the XML editor I preferred instead of the one one the IT department recommended.

    If the iMac should expire I certainly wouldn't be looking at the current models for a replacement, very pretty but not what I want. I might actually consider a 32" 4K monitor and run that from the MacBook Pro when needed.
     
  8. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    My current office PC dates to 2011 I think. It was pretty high spec when I bought it, but is a bit long in the tooth now.
    The two remote mini PCs were bought barebones and I added storage and OS.
    Will be looking for a new image processing PC, but the figures I've seen after speccing them have been north of £2k, well north in some cases.
     
  9. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    I've actually still got an old working 486 DX running Windows 3.11 on DOS 6.0. It actually has a network card in, but I'm not going to connect it up. Surprisingly quick using Word for Windows v 1.0a, but really it's just for a bit of fun every now and then.
    Our old desktop is an original generation Core i7 - had been a very expensive machine that I got half price when it was discontinued. It's over 10 years old and still usable.

    My main photo desktop has had everything replaced since I bought it, I think the only component still in use is the HDD, and that's now additional storage built-in. Actually, the keyboard and mouse are original too. Copes fine with files from my 50MP camera, so that won't be going anywhere in a hurry.
     
  10. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    When I switched to Apple, around 12 years ago, I was replacing my computers around every two years because they had become un-useably slow and finally Vista decided to deny me access to some of my files. In those days Microsoft's approach was very different from what it is now. When I bought a new computer it took all day to reload the software and transfer the content to a new machine. Looking back it is obvious that the answer would have been a clean rebuild of Windows but in those days the OS came on a CD ROM so all the updates would have had to be reapplied. Today both Microsoft and Apple make a reload of the OS at the latest update readily available. In most respects, as with cameras and cars, there isn't much to choose between them. Microsoft still haven't mastered restarting back to the shut-down status and believe they own every Windows computer, Apple make fantastically solid cases and expect you to buy their phone, tablet etc. to go with the computer.

    If all you want to do is brows the web, edit photographs, record music and/or run office software either will do more than you will ever need. If you buy a Windows computer "off the shelf" you may need to add more RAM, 4GB isn't enough in my limited experience. Otherwise it is now personal preference rather than for the strengths or one over the other.

    Interestingly a Windows laptop with asimilar spec to my MacBook comes in at £2,000 so the prices are more comparable than I thought.
     
  11. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Yesterday I had a new battery fitted to my iPhone 6, it died 15 months ago apparently. I put it on charge when I got home and by 1600 it was fully charged. At 2100 this evening it was showing 99% charge, no SIM just Wi-Fi connection. Just goes to show what depletes the battery.
     
  12. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Using it as a phone!
     
    GeoffR likes this.
  13. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Yup!
     
  14. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    This still works, too. Mind you, it's a decade since I've been able to get it to run on batteries, so not as ultra-portable as it once was :(

    HP Omnibook 425 computer.JPG
     
  15. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    This is an interesting one. For a number of years I noted that my phone would lose relatively little battery life overnight, sometimes only 2 or 3 percent.... but when I was away on foreign holidays (remember those?) the battery would deplete a lot more. I mentioned this on another forum and had a couple of replies relating to hotel wifi networks not being all that "good" so in 2019 I experimented by turning the phone into "flight" mode overnight so it wasn't continually looking for wifi or mobile phone networks. Result: Battery hardly depleted overnight whilst away from home.
    Conclusion: it appears that a lot of battery life is spent looking for networks and attempting to connect to them. A short while ago we had issues with the wifi at home (general issue in the area) and I only noticed that this was happening because in the morning, the mobile phone battery was quite low instead of its usual 90+ percent
     
  16. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    The question is: "Is smaller necessarily better?"
    In the case of a gentleman of my advanced years, it is, sadly, a question that no longer has any personal relevance.:rolleyes:
     
    John Farrell and daft_biker like this.
  17. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    Hurrah! Someone brought the conversation down to the gutter *and it wasn't me!*
     
    John Farrell, MJB, Zou and 2 others like this.
  18. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    You're just miffed because he got in first;)
     
    miked likes this.
  19. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    I think if you read @miked's post he wouldn't necessarily manage that feat...:rolleyes:
     
    miked likes this.
  20. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    *snigger*
     
    miked likes this.

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