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If you're feeling really adventurous ...

Discussion in 'Photographic Locations' started by Footloose, Aug 20, 2018.

  1. Footloose

    Footloose Well-Known Member

    May I suggest the following two locations? They both offer unbounded photo opportunities, but they are both a tad too far away,:D whilst the second probably has a rather too unhospitable environment:

    We are talking about visiting Brazil, stopping off at the Teatro Opera house, which was built by the 'Rubber Barons', to bring 'culture' from Europe to Brazil.

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/atlas_ob...he_unlikely_opera_house_in_manaus_brazil.html

    This then neatly leads us to another rubber industry location, Fordlândia, a disastrously unsuccessful town constructed during the late 1920's by Henry Ford deep in the Amazon for the people operating the rubber plantations that he sunk 10's of millions of dollars into.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/20/...exploring-the-ruins-of-fords-fantasyland.html
     
  2. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    It's worth asking yourself, though, how ANYONE gets to visit such locations. Broadly they fall into one of two groups.

    1: "Trustafarians", living on family money in one way or another. I have met a fair number in my travels, though a minority overall as compared with the second category below:

    2: People who work very hard and are very good at what they do, but sacrifice many other things (e.g. new cars, anything but minimal housing, eating out, cinemas, even relationships) in order to travel and take pictures. Some take other jobs to support their photographic habit. Again, I've met 'em. A few in this group even manage to earn enough money from their photography to travel and take pictures, without a "day job". That's pretty much what I used to do, albeit combined with writing.

    People who don't get to the "magical" destinations will lack one or more of family money, determination, luck or talent. Any one can make up for deficiencies in the others but without at least one, no-one ever gets anywhere.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  3. Footloose

    Footloose Well-Known Member

    In my sister's case, she's been to places such as Russia, where she visited the Hermitage museum and one of the 'Art Deco' underground networks, the Opera house I've referred to, (but was put off by the health risks to her partner, who has a heart condition so they didn't continue onto Fordlandia) and toured extensively around the Castile region in Spain in a big camper-van. She's the household's main money-earner and none of this money was via inheritence. What infuriates me, is she's not into photography! - But then, having said that, maybe that's part of the reason why she can afford trips like this ...
     
  4. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I was lucky eventually working for an airline. I got around a bit over 13 years having fun in far flung places.
    My most exciting though was a trip from RAF Filton in a rattling Britannia on a day trip to Gibraltar in 1967. That landing!! The Rock. Everything after that I was cool and calm and a 'traveller', but my first stays with me always. That whole week was a terrific experience, seeing Concorde being built. being wined and dined, doing short hop flights - and just having enough air hours left for the Gibraltar trip. Phew.
     
  5. Mark101

    Mark101 Well-Known Member

    Not with that crime rate thanks :eek:
     
  6. Roger Hicks

    Roger Hicks Well-Known Member

    Sorry: I forgot plain common-or-garden tourism by rich non photographers.

    Cheers,

    R.
     
  7. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    I recall in the early 1980s meeting an young Indian gentleman early in the morning at the National Trust's Stourhead Gardens in Wiltshire. He was 'doing Europe' on his parents' money, and in the UK was only going to London, Stratford-upon-Avon and Stourhead. We had a conversation because he had a gold-plated 'male jewelry' Leica SLR camera body and one of their massive 50 mm large-aperture lenses (F 1.4, or possibly F 1.2), but clearly had no idea how to them. He didn't even know that the lens could be taken off the body, until I showed him. The camera body and lens were probably worth more than the small terraced house my wife and I had recently purchased.

    I was using a new Pentax MX with its 50 mm F1.7 lens, and since I appeared to know what I was doing it, he asked me if I could help him with his Leica. After a few minutes I asked him why, since he had no idea how to use it, he had purchased it. The reply probably applies to some purchasers of current top-of-the-range full frame cameras - he had been told it was the best type of camera, and of course he only purchased the best model from the most expensive manufacturer.

    Finally, he told me that he was going next to Mexico and Brazil. I always wondered how far he would get before his camera was stolen.
     
  8. Ritika Shaikh

    Ritika Shaikh Active Member

    Good Suggestion, I would prefer the second one! Amazon Ford’s Fantasyland.
     

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