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Idly Wondering

Discussion in 'Appraisal Gallery' started by MickLL, May 23, 2020.

  1. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    I was bored and watching the garden. It seemed to me that these foxgloves were following the sun - that it slowly turning so that the pointed end was always toward the sun.
    Do they do that?
    Sorry if this should have been in another 'room'
    MickLL

    fox.jpg
     
  2. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    I thought most plants did that?
     
    Catriona likes this.
  3. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    I don't think that they all do. Sunflowers certainly do (clue in the name I suppose). Geraniums don't and neither do peonies. I didn't know about foxgloves.

    MickLL
     
  4. daft_biker

    daft_biker Action Man!

  5. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I think most plants are phototrophic to some degree, usually in their development phase. Certainly the seedlings for the allotment all prefer to grow toward the light when they are small. This is obvious as we grow from seed in the house in trays against the patio windows. Foxgloves tend to have their flowers facing one-direction so it is possible that, like sunflowers, they will adopt a characteristic orientation when growing. Once grown I doubt they twist. I'll try to remember to look, we haven't (m)any* foxgloves in the garden this year but I have a feeling that, in the past the flowers on different plants have faced in different directions according to which side of the garden they are planted. One side gets the sun most of the day, the other only in the morning because of shade from a fence.

    *any that are there are self-seeded. I don't remember seeing any this year but it would surprise me if there were none.
     
  6. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    I now think that Foxgloves are not heliotropic (thanks for that word). The ones in my south facing garden give that illusion but the ones in my neighbour’s north facing front garden point every which way and don’t move.
    MickLL
     
    daft_biker likes this.
  7. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    But do they get direct sun if behind the house?
     
  8. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    The mechanisms for this were fascinating when we explored them in A level biology. Made me question very early the notion of intelligence in living things.
     
  9. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    Yes - late and early.

    MickLL
     
  10. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Ah, now the test of intelligence would surely be if they face the sun at sunrise and then turn 180 degrees in anticipation of getting it again later.
     
  11. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    Foxgloves with brains! That's something. This morning (front and back) they are pointing every which way and also leaning drunkenly towards the East. Lockdown is making me crazy!!
    Maybe I'll drive to Durham. :)

    MickLL
     
  12. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Ah, they're confused. You need to play them soothing music.
     
  13. ascu75

    ascu75 Well-Known Member

    Our foxgloves are only three innches tall but I can see nthem from the dinning room so will lookk out to see what tey doo
     
    Catriona likes this.
  14. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Not if they see you first, you won't;)
     

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