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How can I scan 8mm film

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Stephen Rundle, May 25, 2020.

  1. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle Well-Known Member

    Once there was a way to scan 8mm film, the Kodak Scanza does it but I can not justify that

    I have some old film with grand parents who have died and would like to capture some images.

    I could...................... I suppose ! use a slide copier https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Jessop-Z...466804?hash=item1f105c3df4:g:DBYAAOSwFiZerZNV

    Or, somehow make a holder for my Epson V600 I have had for years

    Any ideas appreciated

    Thanks
     
  2. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Will the film lie flat or will it curl? I've been able to scan 5x4 just lying on the scanner glass, but 120 with inherent roll doesn't work so well without a holder, gets Newton rings.
     
  3. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    I wanted to resurrect some 8. mm of my wedding and I projected re-filming it with a DSLR I was surprised how good the result was
     
    EightBitTony likes this.
  4. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle Well-Known Member

    I lays flat but without a holder the scanner will not "see" it
     
  5. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle Well-Known Member


    Hmm..... so I need to buy a projector :(
     
  6. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    What software are you using? I use Vuesacan which will capture the entire glass area, it doesn't rely on holders being in place. Even with Epson software I'd expect to be able to manually scan on transparency mode.
     
  7. RogerMac

    RogerMac Well-Known Member

    Or borrow one. It is surprising how many are still tucked at the back of cupboards. I must admit it might be better to have it done professionally if a suitable projector is not available
     
    Stephen Rundle likes this.
  8. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle Well-Known Member

    The epson will not "recognize" a scan if the holders are not in place
     
  9. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Bugger. Mine (Epson 4490) is as mentioned ok with that.

    Can you try laying the section within a 120 holder to trick it into scanning?
     
  10. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle Well-Known Member


    Yep and this is it, 120, 35mm etc oh and I did try slide setting also (positive film)





    dfgb.jpg
     
  11. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    In the "original" section, you may have a generic transparency option instead of "film". That should not require holders.
     
  12. AGW

    AGW Well-Known Member

    I used to have a link for an American manfacturer who specialised in making odd sized film holders for Epsons... cant find just now! They do exist!

    Graeme
     
    Stephen Rundle likes this.
  13. AGW

    AGW Well-Known Member

    Stephen Rundle likes this.
  14. Footloose

    Footloose Well-Known Member

    Does your 8mm film have a continuous grey stripe running down the side of it? If so, it also has a sound-track! Have a look here, for secondhand projectors:
    https://www.ebay.co.uk/b/8mm-Film-Projectors/15252/bn_85627

    Just make sure you are using Ebay.co.uk and also select the 'Item location' to the United Kingdom, so you don't end up with items listed from god knows where!

    There are some cheap working projectors for sale, some of these with sound playback for the same price as the cine copying or transfer units being offered, but the projector would probably give you much better image quality. As for manufacturers, Eumig would be my preference based on their ease of use and reliability.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2020
    Stephen Rundle likes this.
  15. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle Well-Known Member

    Ok Ill look thanks
     
  16. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    Due to the very small image size on the film, might the best idea (since you only want to copy a few frames) be to use a macro lens on a suitable camera? You could try carefully attaching the piece of film to a clean piece of very thin white paper (by its edge), attaching that to window on an overcast day, and using a tripod for the camera body and lens. If the image is not perfectly 'square' in the frame, or does not fill it, a few moments with some basic photo editing software will fix this, as well as allowing contrast/brightness adjustments. Also, if the film is colour, the colour balance may need adjustment if some colours have faded.

    The white paper suggestion is because you need to let light shine through the film, but it needs to be diffuse. If you have an old LED 'light box' of the type once used for examining mounted transparencies, try this instead, but it will be horizontal and perhaps more difficult to photograph.

    Be very careful not to scratch the film when handling it, and watch out for dust.
     
    Stephen Rundle likes this.
  17. Roger_Provins

    Roger_Provins Well-Known Member

    As with most things to do with scanning VueScan usually has the answer.
     
  18. Stephen Rundle

    Stephen Rundle Well-Known Member

    Good idea
     
  19. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    I agree - Vuescan currently runs my 20 year old Minolta 35 mm film scanner and a 15 year old A4 flat scanner on my Windows 10 PC. The original software for both would not work when I moved to Windows 7 in 2013, and I purchased Vuescan then. It is worth paying the extra for the version with regular updates: the interface for the A4 scanner in particular has been improved a lot since 2013.
     

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