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Hi everyone I need advice

Discussion in 'Introductions...' started by Sean wilson, Feb 26, 2020.

  1. Sean wilson

    Sean wilson New Member

    Hi I’m a newbie photographer and I’m mainly interested in wildlife and sports photography and I’ve seen an almost new canon 7d mkii with under 100 actuations for £650 would it be a worthwhile purchase as it will be my main camera for a few years to come thanks in advance for all your help.
     
  2. beatnik69

    beatnik69 Well-Known Member

    Sounds like a bargain to me, considering it is £1379 brand new.
     
  3. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    If you get on with Canon cameras, that is probably the best starting point. Only a service centre or a hacker can get the number of shutter actuations on a Canon, it isn't published.

    As with all used equipment there is a benefit from buying from someone who will give a guarantee. The big shops all sell s/h equipment if you check LCE, WEX, MPB, FFORDES you'll get an idea of current price with at least a 6 month guarantee.
     
  4. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

  5. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

  6. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    This is from Astro Photography Tool for my 7d2

    upload_2020-2-27_15-6-24.png

    Looks legitimate to me based on my Lightroom folders.
     
  7. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I stand corrected.
     
  8. Sean wilson

    Sean wilson New Member

    Thanks so much for the advice folks greatly appreciated. So will the 7D mkii be a good choice for now and the foreseeable future?
     
  9. Snorri

    Snorri Well-Known Member

    Yes, the 7D both the original and the MK II are great cameras. Pair it with ether the excellent EF-S 15-85 (my go to lens) or the all mighty EF-S 17-55 f2.8 arguably the best all around lens for APS-C camera and you will be set for the foreseeable future.
    I do agree that buying from a reputable dealer that gives warranty would be a good idea.
     
  10. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Though, depending on what wildlife interests you, a longer focal length lens will likely be needed.
     
    Snorri and EightBitTony like this.
  11. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    'I’ve seen an almost new canon 7d mkii with under 100 actuations for £650'.
    It looks like a bargain, but is it too good to be true? Be very careful unless buying from somebody you know (and trust) or from a reputable dealer who offers a guarantee. Perhaps somebody purchased it and gave up after only 100 shots (people in the trade have told me this happens sometimes), or perhaps it's stolen and they want to get rid of it quickly.
     
  12. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    It happens - that's how I got my Fuji X-H1 - lady didn't like it. If only I realised that I was one of the few that did as the new price bombed well below what I paid s/h :(
     
  13. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    The example I saw was a full-frame Canon DSLR that had been purchased 'because it got a good review', and part-exchanged a month later with less than 100 shutter 'actuations' because its owner had decided it was too heavy. When originally purchased, he just walked into the shop and paid for it without handling it or asking any questions. So it was a a stupid mistake for him and a genuine bargain for somebody else. But it wasn't resold for half the price of a new one, which is why I advised caution.
     
  14. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Probably a very long one. Really, with sports and wildlife as interests, you should be choosing a lens almost before a camera. For sports, 200mm will often do, but really needs to be a constant f2.8 to lose the background. That's what the pros use. For wildlife, you have to get quite close for a 300mm to be enough. That and a doubler, or a 500mm+ would probably be better.
     
  15. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Agree - the blog here is good advice if bird photography is your thing: http://mikeatkinson.net/Tutorial-1-Introduction.htm Tutorial 3 covers equipment. I did a day one-to-one with Mike before deciding to buy a 500.
     
  16. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    I probably should not have said "almost" before a camera. Pros in both those disciplines drummed into me long ago that they chose a body that suited the lens, not other way round. Of course that was before IS, effective focus tracking and a lot of other goodies built into bodies that have made both those subjects far easier. But the big giveaway between Pro and Am sports photography is usually the backgrounds and with nature, it is how close. Yes you can crop in more and more, but if you want every feather, you still need to be filling the frame.
     

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