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Help, I can't keep up...

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by miked, Jan 16, 2020.

  1. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    I'm still in the land of 'yesterday' when it comes to the spoken word. As yet I'm still pronouncing 'absolutely' with a 'b', and not, as has been fashionable for a while, 'p'. Now I'm having to come to terms with 'had' being pronounced as, 'hat'. And, to put me squarely in the past tense, I don't use 'yes' (or 'yeah') as a question, as most folk seem to be doing: Eg: We'll go down town, 'yeah'?
    To make matters worse, I still can't get the hang of glottal-stopping, and, in my quaint old-fashioned way, pronounce, 'exciting' as it's written instead of 'Ex...i...ing'.
    Is it time for me to retire to a quiet place of refuge, eg: a monastery?
     
  2. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Well, that's a living language for you. Doesn't age with us. ;)
     
  3. neilt3

    neilt3 Well-Known Member

    I wasn't aware anything had changed .
    Apart from some of these young ones do appear to be getting thicker .
    Try to explain simple things , that really should just be common sense , and it just doesn't sink in .
    I'll continue speaking English with a bit of Anglo Saxon thrown in for good measure .
     
    NickM and Catriona like this.
  4. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Yous knows yous trouble, like? Yous just not one of the flock, init...

    Sheep in field Clyst St Mary G9 P1012034.JPG
     
    miked likes this.
  5. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    To add to my woes I can't get to grips with the lack of saying 'thee' when a word beginning with a vowel follows, as for instance, "The owl and the pussycat"....etc., where once we said, 'Thee owl and...." is now glottal-stopped, "The owl and...".
    And on TV last night was an advertisement for some musical show, when some teeny voice-over announced, "Yer gonna wanna hear this." UGH!!

    Time to exit, stage left....
     
  6. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    don't worry we could all be speaking American.
     
  7. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member


    I'm with you!!

    If you combine what you say with my difficulty with some accents (see another thread) and add my high register deafness into the mix then I'm in real trouble in some circumstances. In the past, talking to a friend, we have discussed living in France and she always said, "I couldn't - there's no way I could be ill in French".
    Recently I've spent a lot of time in hospitals (not me!!) I'm starting to think that about the UK. I can't get ill - I'd need a translator.

    Mick (Meldrew)LL
     
  8. Trannifan

    Trannifan Well-Known Member

    How about dialect/regional patois?

    Hey up mi duck! Happen as how t'owl and t'pussycat..........

    Lynn
     
  9. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    I love regional dialects and local sayings - they add spice and fun to the language. As a boy in Lancashire we had all manner of local sayings: "He were agate..." meaning, "He was doing..." was just one.
     
  10. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    As, for instance, in Norfolk: "Ha you bin-a firtling wi yer nether parts?":eek:
     
  11. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    I'm with you on that. I just sent a complaint to Virgin Media about them ringing me every week from a call-centre in India. I have often found these to be better and more understandable than the Scottish ones in the past, but Virgin's are unintelligible. I got a call back....yes from a call centre in India....but she did at least speak slowly and clearly and agreed to take me off the list and just write when they have something to offer me. She also knocked £20 off my monthly bill for the next year, so guess what I'll be doing this time next year?

    It pays to complain.
     
  12. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Who aksed ewe?
     
    neilt3, Catriona and miked like this.
  13. DaveM399

    DaveM399 Well-Known Member

    Years ago, my broadband supplier was Freeserve, and I had to call their support line once. I would have liked it to be India, but sadly, it was somewhere near Newcastle upon Tyne!
     
    RovingMike likes this.
  14. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Bit foggy was it?
     
    SqueamishOssifrage, DaveM399 and Zou like this.
  15. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    I too like regional dialect. It's when the sound emanating from a mouth is just an unintelligible noise that I get a bit cross.

    MickLL
     
  16. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    and was it all his?

     
  17. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    Above tells me: Video unavailable.......
     
  18. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    Just be glad it isn't New York who hosts your call centre (yet!) I can't listen to that accent for long. Indian much better.
     
  19. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

  20. dangie

    dangie Senior Knobhead

    People who when answering a question begin the answer with "So ....."

    Since when and how has "So" become the default word to begin an answer with..??
     
    miked and Catriona like this.

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