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Hello to one & all

Discussion in 'Introductions...' started by Mark Bower, Sep 20, 2020.

  1. Mark Bower

    Mark Bower New Member

    Hi every one i an 59 years old now but when i was 24 i use to do a lot of photography i even had my own darkroom.
    so here i am some years later starting a new with DSLR ( no darkroom )
    I now have a Nikon D3500 not the best but a good start.
     
    EightBitTony likes this.
  2. steveandthedogs

    steveandthedogs Well-Known Member

    Hello!

    S
     
  3. Modelier

    Modelier New Member

    Hi and welcome, kinda new here myself. I will place a post soon after this, maybe with some pictures and an introduction. Very interested in this community :)
     
  4. beatnik69

    beatnik69 Well-Known Member

    Hi Mark and welcome. It's not the camera, it's what you do with it. ;)
     
  5. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    Your Nikon 3500 was introduced in 2016, the Pentax I use was introduced in 2010, and some other forum members will own and use models older still. Don't get tempted to 'upgrade' until you are certain you have outgrown your current camera body, or desperately need (not just want) some latest 'must have' feature that a newer model may have (but at a cost).

    If you previously used a 35 mm film camera, note that your Nikon 3500 has an 'APS-C' sized sensor (about the same size sensor as a 35 mm half frame camera), so a 50 mm lens (for example) will give results that look like 75 mm used on your film camera. The sensor size difference can be confusing (been there and done that about 1o years ago). I have found some parts of this website helpful, after other form members recommended it.

    https://www.cambridgeincolour.com/

    If you only have the 18-55 kit lens, any funds 'burning a hole in your pocket' should be saved for additional lenses once you decide you want to take shots that the 18-55 cannot do (a wide angle lens or longer telephoto, for example). Since you've only recently returned to photography, you'll find that the secondhand market is wonderful, and the reputable retailers who regularly advertise in AP have websites that make this temptingly straightforward. And since you have a Nikon DSLR with an 'APS-C' sized sensor (about the same size sensor as a 35 mm half frame camera), you will find a lot of choice of good condition used lenses. I have purchased only one lens new in the last 20 years (and that was a discontinued model sold with a discontinued DSLR body at a great price), but have purchased six secondhand. For example, the first secondhand lens I purchased after 'going digital' was an old-model Sigma 10-20 zoom (15-30 equivalent on a fill frame 35 mm camera body) for £250 when they were £370 new, but I've recently seen these in good condition going for under £200. I love this lens, and when I got my first 35 film SLR in 1974 lenses like this didn't exist (I now expect another forum member to tell us about a 15-30 that did exist for 35 mm film cameras then, but if one did it must have cost a fortune).
     
  6. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    ^
    The D3500 was announced in August 2018, not 2016.

    Welcome, Mark. I'm very slightly older than you and used to do my own D&P back in the 1970's and 1980's when I was a lot younger. Getting married and having 2 kids meant no money for photography for a long time but I went digital with my first DSLR (a Nikon D80) in 2006 when a savings plan paid out. The basics have changed little but the cameras have changed a lot !

    They're more like a computer with an image sensor built in. Not just simple things like ISO, aperture and shutter speed to change but a whole lot more. Do take time to read the instruction manual; it took me about 6 months when I got the D80 until I was "happy" with the out-of-camera images. There's nothing like going out and taking photos to get into the swing of going digital, and unlike film the loads of photos you take to not costa anything to "develop and print". Whatever you do (with the camera), have fun and enjoy yourself
     
  7. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Welcome aboard.
     
  8. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Hello Mark, and welcome.

    Hope you're enjoying photography again.
     
  9. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    My mistake - it's even more recent that I realised.
    Should be good for many more year yet.
     

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