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Heatwave and lenses

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by pixelpuffin, Aug 12, 2020.

  1. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    Is anyone else worried what this humid heatwave may do to our precious lenses.
    At present the vast bulk of my canon system sits loose inside large clear plastic boxes along with at least a dozen 50g silica gel sachets. However I’m still not entirely convinced.
    Anyone else fretting??
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    No. They are made to serve a global market and while this is hot for us it really isn’t.
     
    SqueamishOssifrage likes this.
  3. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    I’m not convinced, hope you’re right
    Well would I be right in thinking having lenses stored in heavily padded camera bags in this heat is asking for trouble?
    I’ve just spent a tenner buying a further 20 50g silica gel sachets, I’m paranoid of my lenses becoming infected with fungus due to lenses “sweating“.
     
  4. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    Not at all.
     
  5. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    Why??
     
  6. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    My daughter lives in Seoul, South Korea where summer temperature is typically high 20s/low 30s Celsius with 80% humidity and she has no issues with her lenses. Suffice to say I'm not bothered by a couple of hot days.
     
    EightBitTony likes this.
  7. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    thank you, that’s a very valid point. I guess I’m over reacting.
    I have a couple of telescopes sat in their vintage wooden cases in the loft, neither has been used for the past 20yrs at least. Somehow I doubt they will have survived too well.
     
  8. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    20 years ago there was still a strong market in Japan for environmentally controlled storage cabinets for cameras and lenses. Possibly unnecessary but enough felt a need...
     
  9. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    which has just made me remember all the lenses I’ve seen on eBay from Japan listing fungus issues.
     
  10. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    They should be build strong enough to survive what the world throws at them. Our heatwave is nothing compared to climates in other parts of the world. I have not had issues in far hotter and / or more humid conditions. Personally I would never store any photography equipment in plastic boxes, but that is just me.
     
  11. Chester AP

    Chester AP Well-Known Member

    The main problem may be if you move from a hot place into cooled one and get some condensation on the front element or inside the lens. If so, wait a few minutes before using it.
     
  12. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    If you feel strongly about it, then by all means put your mind at rest. No point in worrying yourself. Belt and braces won’t hurt.

    The risk factors are:
    • You have a problem with damp in your house, particularly where you keep lenses.
    • Lenses are kept in an unheated and unventilated room over winter.
    • You regularly put lenses away wet, or leave them in a soaking wet camera bag.
    • You regularly bring cold lenses into a warm wet atmosphere. In this country that’s winter but if it was Singapore and you had air conditioning then taking a lens at 20 C out into high 30s and 100% humidity without acclimatisation and doing the reverse probably wouldn’t be too clever.
     
  13. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Now we just have personal wine coolers.
     
  14. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    A quick look suggests that parts of Japan have a sub-tropical climate. High temperature, high humidity and air-conditioning is probably a bad mix.
     
    Zou likes this.
  15. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    actually none of this apply...phew
    If I shoot sons soccer in the rain, the entire camera and lens is stripped of everything, batteries, cards, eyecup, grip, caps etc etc everything is wiped, then all is put into a sealed airtight container with a dozen or so jumbo bags of silica gel, it stays there until next use (7days usually)
     
  16. neilt3

    neilt3 Well-Known Member

    It depends on what you call vintage .
    The loft should have a degree of ventilation .
    If it didn't the roof timbers would be rotting .
    If your roofs sound then so are the wooden boxes .
    If the telescopes are truly vintage , rather than just old ( what's old ?) Then they won't have coatings on the lens .
    It's the coatings the fungi eat away on lenses .
    No coatings , no fungi .
    Same goes for antique camera lenses .
    It's a lack of ventilation that's the issue , ie putting things in plastic boxes .
    Water absorbing crystals remove a certain amount before being exhausted , so it depends on if the boxes are sealed airtight or not .
    Normal storage boxes from a hardware store are not airtight , so your not going to remove all the moisture in the air in the box with the sachets anyway , as it gets replaced with the moist air getting threw the gaps .
    Think of air as a sponge .
     
  17. SqueamishOssifrage

    SqueamishOssifrage Well-Known Member

    Cyprus is the coolest place I have lived in for over forty years. I have had bloom in two Minolta lenses from 1985, which became evident three years ago. My Zeiss, Sigma and Tamron lenses from the same era are still in excellent working order. Summer midday temperatures rarely drop below 35°C, sometimes exceeding 42°C. As a small island, the summer humidity rarely drops below 50%, and is usually much higher.

    None of my current Sony/Minolta/Sigma/Tamron/Tokina/Samyang* lenses show any signs of blooming or fungus, and they are just kept in camera bags in a cupboard.

    * I'm an equal-opportunity employer! ;)
     
  18. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    The roof is ventilated, but being the highest part of the house, covered in black tiles, with the sun beating down all day, ventilation does not prevent heat build up.
    As for telescopes, pair of Swift 831 Refractors (1964) supposedly fitted with Takahashi front cell. Coated?? I assumed they were?? I know all the original eyepieces that are stored inside the boxes are coated. I’ve often thought of selling, but if I let go I’ll never be able to find another.

    Plastic Boxes... this has caused me quite a bit of worry. If they are air tight and the internal temperature rises then heat can’t escape or if they are just normal plastic boxes with all lenses stood upright air can circulate, no padding or fabric to a absorb moisture, plenty of silica gel packs (giant 50g), clear plastic sides as I read fungus thrives in dark damp environment.
    House isn’t damp in the slightest, even in winter with heating on (warm air system) there is absolutely no condensation anywhere.
    I’m hoping I’ve done the right thing. I’m guessing most would just leave the cameras and lenses shoved inside thick padded bags, which are also dark inside when closed....perfect environment to trap heat and encourage fungus I read.
     
  19. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    My film kit is in one such. Apart from one time I changed the camera batteries it hasn’t been out of the bag since 2008.
    My mirrorless kit mainly lives in a camera bag. It usually gets used but not since lockdown began as I haven't been out walking. I’m not risking camera gear on my bicycle, road surfaces are far too rough.
    The rest stuff lives in a heap in the bottom, deep filing drawer of an office cabinet. All my lenses have either hard or soft covers. I have a super-telephoto in a hard case. That is likely to be closest to hermetic storage. I have a pele case which is truly hermetic but it is empty.
     
  20. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Pretty much all the Japanese ebay stuff is what couldn't sell in the very strong domestic second hand market. Their standards are really really high most of the time; very rare to get issues. I have a mint Nikkor AIS 50mm f1.4 which I bought for £30 from a 'junk' store in Japan. Why? The cap was ever so slightly scratched. :confused:
     
    Scphoto likes this.

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