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Fuji RAW Files (RAF)

Discussion in 'Fujifilm Cameras' started by Craig20264, Sep 3, 2020.

  1. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    I've added it to my development software, and found it is great for Fuji RAW file work - and, as you say, "It's free"!!!!!
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Can you print from it? I think that’s why I didn’t stick with the original ‘lite’ version back in 2008/9 or so.
     
  3. miked

    miked Well-Known Member

    Haven't tried a direct print from Capture One. I've been exporting into PS6 and printing from there with really good results. I'm beginning to wonder why I never tried the program much earlier, but I suppose, better late than never.
     
  4. Jeff Lee

    Jeff Lee Member

    I get them ok so I wonder if you're saving RAW only?
     
  5. Jeff Lee

    Jeff Lee Member

    Thanks for the reminder of the Express version. I kept hearing about Capture One and when I've gone back to investigate, the Fuji site links to the full version. I just tried Express to see how it handles RAW and sure enough, no worms. What I want is the editing features of Photoshop though. So that means opening in Capture One and exporting the best possible image to PS. I tried tiff, png and even jpg but none of them are as good as the Fuji JPGs! They all look like electronic images enlarged, whereas the Fuji JPGs have an organic grain to them that brings out details otherwise lost in the other formats. I'll try Capture One a bit more but I'll probably stick with using Fuji JPGs while keeping RAWs for generating JPGs in the future in other Fuji film simulations. It's a pity that Adobe's RAW handling from Fuji has this problem at high magnifications. It limits the range for pulling more picture information out in post. I've seen a YouTube video though where someone demonstrates a Camera RAW update (not in 2020 releases) that (kind of) addresses the issue (ish) with what looks like a blurry grain-pattern effect:
     
  6. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    That video is about the Enhanced Details feature in ACR. The presenter seems at pains to explain that the video is for people who are “picky about how their 300% view of their pixels looks”. Maybe that’s why I haven’t related to the “worm” issue. As far as I can see my Fuji files are fine. Why on earth look at 300 % magnification ? That’s using 9 screen pixels to represent each camera pixel. Useful maybe if retouching pixel by pixel (though I’m not sure how that can work with more than 100% view) but I can’t see the problem unless someone is seriously upsizing images.
     
  7. Jeff Lee

    Jeff Lee Member

    Indeed it depends on end use. As he says, some people are disturbed by the uneveness of the grain when retouching. I can understand this if someone's getting strange results when using a cloning tool. I can see that it might also be wierd if printed really large. Does anyone really do that? I'd have thought that if you're looking at A1 and above then you wouldn't be using 24/26 megapixel.

    I use RAWs and JPGs as reference images in Painter. Grain patterns are only noticeable if I use high percentages of source photos in some areas of a finished work. But then it's unlikely to be the plain / featureless areas of a photo that show the wormy grain. I gravitate towards Fuji RAWs anyway because the Fuji colour / mono simulations and grain patterns lend themselves better to painting. I generally get a good exposure / histogram, and painting can entail major changes, so adding any photographic workflow needs to be justifiable, including RAW processing.
     
  8. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I read the Adobe blogs on Enhanced Details and on Super Resolution (which takes Enhanced Details a step further) this morning. As far as I can see neither was aimed at doing anything specifically with grain, more to improve demoisaicing around details, although I suppose noise could appear as a detail to an algorithm.

    I tried Super Resolution - it is not yet available in Lightroom - which doubles image linear size. It looks interesting. Like enhance details it is mainly aimed at older raw files rather than 20+ MP ones. My mac is a bit slow for it as, annoyingly, it seems to use the GPU which kills screen refreshes while it is active so the mouse pointer doesn't move and you can't open another window even though the system CPU and memory aren't particularly impacted.
     
  9. JMK

    JMK Well-Known Member

    I have absolutely no problem with converting the RAW (RAF) files from my Fuji X20. I use plain old fashioned photo.shop CC 2020 and have never even considered Lightroom. Lightroom is no where as easy to use as CC which in general does a 1st class job. The X20 is only 12mp but it will happily print an A3 without a problem. I use it as a my 'go anywhere' lens and body and compact enough to to carry comfortably and safely when I'm motorcycling.
     
  10. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    The issue with X-trans raw files seems to rest with those who edit using more than 200% enlargement. I only use 100% to check focus and edit at far less. Like you I have no problem with RAF.

    ACR is almost the same as LR. As far as I know the latest ACR (13.2) is the first version to have a feature ahead of the LR implementation. The interfaces are a bit different but I’m surprised you find ACR significantly easier to use than LR. If you print to A3 from 12 MP do try the new super resolution option out. I thought it looked quite good.
     

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