1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Dust spots after non-use

Discussion in 'Nikon Chat' started by IvorETower, May 17, 2022.

Tags:
  1. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    Yesterday I had a day off work and went to Silverstone to use up a gift ticket at the museum. Afterwards there were some cars on track so I took a few shots and was horrified when I got home to see the huge number of dust spots on the images!
    I post an example below, note especially the sky; these were shot on my D7100 that's basically not been used since the start of covid, so maybe 30 months? I did take a few test shots on Sunday to check it was working OK, and to charge the battery and spares but i didn't scrutinise them for the presence of dust.

    I've spent the best part of half an hour this morning wet-and-dry cleaning it, and it now seems spotless again. I didn't have any issues with it before. Is it normal for such a huge amount of dust to become dislodged when a camera isn't used for an extended period of time?

    If "Dr Dust" still visits these forums, I wonder what he would have to say !
    Dust71K_2234.JPG
     
  2. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Did you store the camera with a lens fitted or just the body cap? Zoom lenses can move a lot of air around and sometimes they will drag in dust which, if the camera is unused, will settle inside the mirror box. Once you start to use the camera again it will be disturbed and some may find its way on to the sensor. Solution, after a period of storage remove the lens and clean out the mirror box with a blower. I can't say I have had problems with either of my lesser used bodies but I store them with the lens removed which might make a difference.
     
  3. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    That is quite spotty! I was going to say that I haven't had a problem with dust and unused cameras but then I remembered that my 1Div hasn't been used since Covid started so I'll have to wait and see. I store cameras with body caps (mainly for space) unless they are in use. Using burst mode, which I guess you'd do at Silverstone, will happily circulate any loose dust in both camera and the back of the lens. Cameras, at least since they started fitting the self-cleaning sensor, have sticky areas to capture dust. Possibly these get less sticky with age - I don't know.
     
  4. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    I recently fired up my old D50 which hadn't seen action for 2 years - didn't notice additional dust problems and certainly nothing as bad you have...:eek:
     
  5. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    It was stored with a lens on, in a hard foam-lined metal camera storage case
     
  6. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    Anyone who had ever owned a 5D (original) will know what it's like to have this much dust after just a few hours of shooting. I enjoyed my 5D, but it was a real dust magnet.
     
  7. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Canon took major steps to ensure that didn't happen again. The 5D II not only had a sensor shake/sticky pad dust removal system, but also had a shutter design and materials to minimise dust creation, along with body caps made of different materials again to produce less dust in use. I don't know if Nikon did these things, or if so, when they did them.
    Further, wasn't the D7100 released somewhere around the time that Nikon were having big oil/dust problems with some cameras?
     
  8. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    My 5D was never that bad! Simple blowing cleared it. Curiously it got “better” with age as if the sensor, when new, was better at holding dust. Although they never clearly mentioned it in the instructions, the DPP 3 spot healing tool could remember the dust spot locations so that, although you did have to spot one image for a day shooting , the results could be applied to all the pictures that day. Then tidying up was then quite easy. Come to think of it, now all my 5D images are in LR. If I go back to a 5D CR2 and reprocess I don’t often find a lot of dust. As far as I know LR doesn’t use DPP edit instructions (they are written into the CR2 I believe) so perhaps it wasn’t always the nuisance we recall. I’ll have a look later at some with skies.
     
  9. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    The D600 was the camera with the oil problem, the camera was introduced in 2012 and discontinued at the end of 2013. The D7100 was introduced in 2013, I don't know whether they have any mechanical parts in common but as the D600 is full frame (FX) and the D7100 has a cropped sensor (DX), probably not.
     
  10. Benchista

    Benchista Which Tyler

    Google shows that although the D600 was the worst affected model, it certainly wasn't the only Nikon model so afflicted - even the D7200 has reports of it. The issue appears to have been a combination of excessive lubrication, and breakdown of the surface coatings of the shutter and mirror mechanism. Frankly, I would frankly be incredulous if this wasn't the same issue in this case, given the circumstances. It more or less MUST be generated by the camera itself, and we know that Nikon were not on top of this issue at the time.
     
  11. zx9r

    zx9r Well-Known Member

    I remember my 5D mk1 was a dust nightmare for the first year or so but the dust problem seemed to reduce as time went on, I suspect they had clean room problems when it was assembled and or some component in the shutter / sensor / mirror assembly caused dust until the shutter had a few thousand cycles.

    Edit: Though it was never as bad as shown in the first post of this thread.
     
  12. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    A few months ago I had a first - dust bunny so large it appeared on the rear screen when lining up shots. :oops:
     
  13. El_Sid

    El_Sid Well-Known Member

    Is the foam in the case OK.

    I have a couple of foam line hard cases which I hadn't opened for quite a long time and the foam in both was degraded - very crumbly and a bit inclined to stick to fingers and case contents. I wonder if some stuck to the camera and then got inside if you changed lenses at any point.
     
  14. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    The foam is ok and no lens changing was involved. Also I took the camera with lens out of the case, closed the case and put it away before removing the camera battery to charge it. The deposits were so fine and numerous that I wonder if they were oil which may have "pooled" with the camera remaining unused and resting in the same place for so long
     
  15. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    If, as you suggest, it was a process issue then it could easily affect several models but if it has been OK for 9 years I wouldn’t go there first. If it gets more deposits after cleaning then definitely worth considering a chat with Nikon.
     
  16. peterba

    peterba Well-Known Member

    That's interesting, Keith. My 5D frequently returned images as dusty as that image - sometimes even worse!

    Maybe I had a bad example. Or perhaps I was less careful than I should have been, when changing lenses.
     
  17. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Or you frequently used F16 and included a lot of sky. My experience (#8) was the same as Keith’s. I only ever used a blower to clean it and then infrequently, when I got fed up spotting dust out.
     

Share This Page