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Do you leave your a lens on your camera

Discussion in 'Lens Matters' started by GeoffR, Nov 13, 2020.

  1. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I’ve never looked at whether the shutter is open or closed when my Fuji’s are off. I’ve always changed lens with the body face down. I presume that, if the shutter is closed, precautions have to be taken to stop sunlight falling directly on the camera lens when the camera is turned off to avoid overheating the shutter.
     
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  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I (nearly) always turn the camera off before changing lenses but the occasions I do change lens the camera will certainly be asleep and effectively “off” given the time it takes to decide to change lens and phaff around getting ready. The main risk is waking it up by touching the shutter release while handling it. On my Canons the camera will respond to a lens change by flashing a red light on the body whether the power switch is on or off so presumably some of the contacts are live at all times.
     
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  3. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    Interesting thought! Usually, if one puts down a camera, the lens axis is more or less horizontal. If the lens was short, the camera could be placed with it pointing upwards, but then I’d be more worried about bird droppings than sunshine, particularly as the sun doesn’t get overhead in this country. But I suppose pointing a camera at the sun is a mistake you’d only need to make once.

    Would getting the sun on the shutter be worse than getting it on the sensor?

    The risk of accidentally getting a telephoto lens aligned with the sun would be tiny. With a wider lens, if it was at infinity, I assume the sun would be fairly well out of focus on the shutter, but I suppose the lens could be in a different position. (I think my Nikon F mount autofocus lenses change focal distance when I review shots on the monitor, but I’ve never investigated what happens when I turn the power off.) Anyway, while still a DSLR user I needn't worry about the sun getting focused anywhere other than on the viewfinder when switched off. As for my LX100 compact, I have an auto lens cap on it, and the lens retreats behind it when I turn the power off, or leave the camera undisturbed for long.


    Chris
     
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  4. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Maybe I am mis-remembering but I thought it was a concern my grandfather had with his TLR. That is going back a fair way! With an SLR and focal plane shutter the mirror protects the shutter curtains so it isn’t a concern, and if a lens cap is used it isn’t a concern either. The case I am thinking is if is walking away from the sun with the camera slung over a shoulder - so “left in the sun for a long time” rather than any photographic act.
     
  5. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    "Walking away from the sun with the camera slung over a shoulder" would this be an SLR, a mirrorless or a rangefinder camera? I ask because it is important.
    In the case of an SLR the sun through the lens will strike the mirror and then, in an extreme condition, start to burn your shirt through the viewfinder.
    With a mirrorless camera, depending on the construction (protective shutter or not) the sun will be on the shutter which will heat up or on the sensor where it may be strong enough to destroy photosites.
    With a rangefinder the sun will be on the shutter.
    I have heard of cases where the sun has burned through a film when a camera was pointed at the sun with the shutter open. Do not lightly dismiss the effects of pointing an optical device at the sun.
     
  6. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Well-Known Member

    While changing lenses the sunlight won't be focused on any part of the camera so won't be an issue (except maybe in the tropics if you leave it for hours). A short time of the sun focused on the sensor is also unlikely to be a concern, but more than a few seconds can be serious, especially with longer/faster lenses. There's a picture on the lens rental blog showing damage done using a rental camera during the run up to an eclipse.
     
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  7. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    It was specifically the case of the mirrorless that has a closed shutter when off, though I had wondered about mirrorless generally since I bought an XE-2. With film SLR’s I always tried to carry them on the shaded side of my body just to keep them out of the sun and stop the camera body getting too hot but I’ve not bothered with digital SLRs. My DSLRs tend to hang downward anyway with the weight of the lens but mirrorless are less likely to do that, especially XE-, X100V.
     
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  8. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    Hi Chris,

    I don't know, but, an ex-coworker of mine was on a trip to NYC and, I forget what he did, but, he burnt a hole in the shutter of his (brand new) Leica M6 :eek:
    However, I'm not sure if it's possible to burn a hole in one's sensor, but, I ain't going to be the one to find out ;)

    Cheers,
    Jack
     
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  9. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    I carry my camera either in my backpack or with a neck strap on my chest, so catching the sun when it’s being carried, rather than parked on a picnic table or similar, hadn’t occurred to me.

    My Pentax SLR had split rings connecting the camera to the strap, positioned so that if I had the “kit” 50mm f/1.7 mounted, I could turn them one way, and the back of the camera would lie flat gently against my chest, with the lens axis more or less horizontal. With a zoom or other long lens, I’d turn the rings the other way, and the lens barrel would lie against my chest, more or less vertical.

    Nikon doesn’t offer that luxury; my DSLRs hang with their weight concentrated on the bottom edge against my chest, and the lens axis diagonally downwards. The metal lugs for the strap on my D90 had sharp edges, and after not much more than a year I noticed the strap had worn a third of the way through. I upgraded to the D800 after a couple of years, but otherwise, if I hadn’t noticed the wear, I might have lost the camera over a bridge parapet or something! My D800 does at least have durable triangular split rings on the strap.


    Chris
     
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  10. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Nikon professional bodies have split rings, triangular as you say, but the consumer bodies have fixed lugs. Canon cameras also have fixed lugs, something I would find most irritating. I am not in the least surprised that the strap on the D90 wore so quickly.
     
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  11. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I keep meaning to get one of those straps that fastens to the baseplate - guaranteed to have the lens facing down. Not sure I’d completely trust it though.
     
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  12. Done_rundleCams

    Done_rundleCams AP Forum Ambassador to Canada

    Hi Pete,

    I have used the Black Rapid system -- base plate style -- and, whilst I, initially, liked it I found out that the screw loosens and I was constantly checking it until one time it
    came undone and camera and lens came crashing to the concrete :eek: Luckily, the kit still worked (and still does) ;) After this, I decided to go to the Peak Design which attaches to where the original strap would be attached :). I've now been using the Peak Design system for around 4 1/2 to 5 years ... with no issues :)

    Cheers,

    Jack
     
  13. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Tx Jack. I’ll look into it.
     
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  14. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    You can buy a strap loop thing that screws into the tripod mount off the internet from many sources. I use this plus some key fob split-rings on this adapter and the right-hand camera strap fixing, and then have the sort of clips you can get for garden hanging baskets on the strap ends. This means that I can easily unclip the strap when home for storage, and also that the camera hangs lens-down rather than lens-sticking-out when I am carrying it. Sometimes I just use a wrist-strap.

    Does the Peak Design system allow the camera to hang lens-down?
     
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  15. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    LOC2.jpg
    I don't think I'll be leaving this lens on the camera too long... just long enough to take the photo. It doesn't look safe
     
  16. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    They do.
     
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