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Do you leave your a lens on your camera

Discussion in 'Lens Matters' started by GeoffR, Nov 13, 2020.

  1. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    A simple enough question, do you keep a lens on your camera/s all the time or do you remove it/them when not in use?
    If you keep the lens/es on all the time you might like to consider this; the contacts that transfer data between camera and lens are designed as "wiping contacts". The point about wiping contacts is that they keep themselves clean by wiping across each other whenever a lens is mounted or removed. If you don't remove your lens/es the contacts never get cleaned.

    I recently had a problem with my 70-200 and TC17 where the camera ceased communicating with the lens. Removing and refitting the lens has solved the problem. I have got lazy and don't put the lens away after use, when I did that I didn't have problems. So, a suggestion, before looking at a repair to your camera or lens, just take it of and refit it a couple of times. Probably worth running a cloth over the contacts as well.
     
  2. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    To the straight question: Yes and No.

    Yes - I mainly store cameras with a lens attached - but I do change lenses quite often.
    No. - I have one camera most often used with a super-telephoto. They get separated every use because the lens lives in its case and the camera gets a body cap on it.
     
  3. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    I leave a lens on my cameras all the time, but not always the same lens.
     
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  4. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    One question though. If the lens is on, and the contacts are in contact, how are they getting dirty enough to need to be cleaned.
     
    Zou likes this.
  5. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    They may be in contact but that doesn’t mean they are sealed, same with every connector but generally the bigger the contact area the less of a problem. I have phono plugs that have been undisturbed for over 20 years but they don’t get moved. Lenses can move and that may mean the contact point moves to a dirty area. With my Nikon lenses the contact area is quite small so it doesn’t take much, I think the Canon contact arrangement is probably better because the Nikon One and Nikon Z series use a similar arrangement to Canon’s.
     
  6. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    For the cameras I use the most, I always keep a lens on, but these are changed quite often although this year has seen long periods of inactivity.

    Touch wood, I have only had one lens with contact issues. It was a used efs lens to replace a kit lens and was probably my not used lens. The first few times I had an error message, cleaning the contacts kept it going but eventually it gave up and I decided the large repair costs were not justified.
     
  7. Terrywoodenpic

    Terrywoodenpic Well-Known Member

    I prefer to keep a lens on. If only because the less often the sensor is exposed, even for a moment, the better. I have never had a problem with lens contacts. The number of times I do change a lens is quite sufficient to keep them clean
     
  8. retrofit

    retrofit Well-Known Member

    yeah, because I only have (one) a 60mm sigma fitted to my omd :D
     
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  9. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    I've been using using lenses and cameras with contacts since 1990 and never had a problem with a lens left permanently on the camera.

    What I used to see often, in the days of big circuit boards in cabinets shared with mechanical components, was the dreaded "walking contacts". A combination of vibration and heat fluctuations would gradually eject chips or plugs from their sockets. Sometimes you could go straight to the culprit and push it home. Other times you could spend an hour or two with a digital tracer trying to find where the problem was.
     
  10. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    My straight answer to the question is that I store the body caps in a box, so normally I only remove a lens to replace it with another.

    I don’t think that’s of any concern regarding my D800; I rarely go more than a few days without changing lenses. Despite that, through most of the camera’s life, it hasn’t gone many days without me needing to wriggle the lens (and sometimes turn the camera off and back on, and fiddle at length) to re-establish contact with the lens. But I don’t think that has much to do with “wiping” the contacts; the problem seems to occur more readily with heavy lenses than light ones, and tends to show as good or bad days rather than the system becoming overdue for a wriggle.

    After 2½ years with a D90, I moved on to the D800. So my D90 has spent most of its life stored with the 17-55mm mounted and the battery removed. It’s also had a couple of long periods (including the present) on loan to my son, who only takes the 17-55mm lens. Given my experience with the D800, I’d have no difficulty myself recognizing and addressing a loss of contact problem. If my son experienced that problem, it might take some diagnosing over the phone, but I’ve never had those issues with the D90, although the 17-55mm is a fairly weighty lens.


    Chris
     
  11. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Yesterday I was having repeated problems but removing and refitting the lens, and splitting lens and converter, resolved the problem. It seems that it doesn't take much for the contacts on Nikon cameras and bodies to develop a minor, but annoying, problem. I think I will revert to removing lenses when the cameras are not in use.
     
  12. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    I suspect I probably changes lenses often enough for it not to be much of an issue.
     
  13. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    In all probability most people are the same, it is only those of us who have multiple camera bodies that are really at any risk.
     
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  14. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    I do have two bodies but shooting stills and video at the moment so I move between using two primes regularly and two zooms so there's still a fair bit of swapping around.
     
  15. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Some of us use lenses without any contacts... Well to be fair I've one with contacts, but all the others are manual.
     
  16. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    I seem to have accumulated too many canon dslrs along with too many lenses. And yet I only have 1 body attached to a lens at any one time.(currently 80d & 55-250) The body’s are stored without battery or cards in a large plastic box with silica gel, the lenses in 2 large separate boxes again with silica gel. After use everything is put back. But I always have one out, just in case...but it’s never needed.

    Your explanation sounds logical. Sounds like I’m doing it right without realising - that’s a first!!
     
  17. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    I seem to have accumulated too many canon dslrs along with too many lenses. And yet I only have 1 body attached to a lens at any one time.(currently 80d & 55-250) The body’s are stored without battery or cards in a large plastic box with silica gel, the lenses in 2 large separate boxes again with silica gel. After use everything is put back. But I always have one out, just in case...but it’s never needed.

    Your explanation sounds logical. Sounds like I’m doing it right without realising - that’s a first!!

    Just out of curiosity, is it not something to do with the spring weakening being compressed overtime? I find a lot of contacts sometimes require a slight lift to give a better contact- not tried it with a lens tho’....
     
  18. Petrochemist

    Petrochemist Well-Known Member

    I have over 20 camera bodies & nearly all are kept with lenses on. The exceptions are a few film bodies where I find the lens useful on digital and the large format cameras that get taken aprt for storage.
     
  19. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    As the springs on my lenses are completely encased I can't see how that might even be possible
     
  20. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    I didn’t mean literally a spring par se
    But copper contacts are often bent (battery terminals) spring (no pun) to mind. I’ve bought many flash guns over the years where batteries have been left in and compressed the contacts enough so don’t work reliably,. I have 2 canon ex guns that were bought spares repair. Both just needed the copper terminal re-bending slightly. Both work flawlessly now. I don’t know Nikon mounts, but canon ef I think are sprung copper terminals??
     

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