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Do you care more about quality or just capturing the moment?

Discussion in 'Talking Pictures' started by Andrew Flannigan, Dec 28, 2017.

  1. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    Agreed.

    I have my cameras set to automatic options including ISO. I'd rather capture an expression with fuzziness than miss it in a technically perfect image.

    Surprised looking woman Exeter bus station  DSC01485.JPG
     
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  2. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    The question of auto ISO or not comes up and I must say I prefer to do as you say and set for the conditions, then leave it. But there are occasions (like that dog on escalator in the competition) where I wished the ISO could have gone up a bit by itself. But I'm not really trying to do candids. I'm trying to get a lot of movement in the Transportation project and auto ISO would kill that. Generally I remember when I have gone inside and it needs to go up.
     
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  3. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    Yes, that's how I am. My little LX100 is very easy to change ISO anyway and I hate the way on auto ISO that is what changes, rather than aperture, for example. The first thing I did on my camera was limit the upper limit of ISO although I am (never) using it.
     
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  4. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    I agree. In my traveling days when I fairly often did a 'safari' I'd set my cameras to auto everything during the 'search phase'. When we found a subject I'd get a few frames using the auto settings (forgot to say this was typically back in my film days!) and then, assuming the subject was cooperative, start to think about the picture and change things to get what I wanted.
    That way I got acceptable quality for a few frames and then I took over :(:(

    MickLL
     
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  5. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    I'm probably wrong but I thought anything higher than base ISO was basically just software adjustments, so surely shooting at 800 and adding a couple of stops of exposure in Lightroom would give just as good (if not better, due to newness of algorithms, fine control of noise etc.) results as shooting at 3200?
     
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  6. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    No idea if that's true or not.
     
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  7. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    In some cases yes but perhaps you want to maintain a fast shutter speed or a small aperture. In that case offering the system the choice of a higher sensitivity may achieve what you want whereas the post processing approach would not (unless you used manual settings to force the combination you want).

    The important thing to remember is that everyone needs to discover what techniques provide the results they want. If something works for you that's good. Just don't try to force it on others or denigrate their ways of working.
     
  8. Geren

    Geren Well-Known Member

    April.jpg

    Okay - so I posted this in my '12 from 2019' thread and said at the time that I was aware of the image's faults...which were largely down to the fact that I'd set my camera up for the conditions in which I would be shooting a plate of toasted sandwich and chips elsewhere in the café (exposure, white balance, ISO etc) but when this pan flared up I just reacted and took a shot only changing what I could in the very short space of time I had to react. I rather like it in spite of the focus being all out of whack and the blown highlights and so on and so forth. It was, to my mind, a moment worth grabbing and I don't much care about the faults. Does it appear on my website? No.
     
  9. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    Quite. In response to people who wish their auto-ISO behaved differently it's good to know how the camera's software works.
     
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  10. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    I'm amazed at what can be done in P'Shop. The picture below was a very hurried grab - absolutely no time whatever to fiddle with settings. The original has the alabaster artifact burned out - no detail whatever. A lot of work and effort later it possible to see what the salesman was selling . Not perfect - not by any means - but it's satisfied me to do it and (to me - stress to me) has produced a pleasing image.

    MickLL

    upload_2020-1-13_12-1-6.jpeg
     
  11. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    I find the noise goes up alarmingly. But that might be a MFT thing.
     
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  12. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    Someone did that?
     
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  13. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    :rolleyes:
     
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  14. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I might not be right but I always took the inverted “hockey-stick” shape of the sensor dynamic range curve as indicating the above is true at higher ISO where the curve is straight and losing one bit of dynamic range per stop of ISO increase. So above 800 say. Near base ISO the decrease in dynamic range is less which I took to indicate there was some amplification of the signal taking place. So results for base ISO and base + 2 stops ISO may not be so different depending on the sensor.
     
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  15. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

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  16. dazdmc

    dazdmc Well-Known Member

    surely it all depends on what you were trying to do at the time?
    When at family events I just want to capture memories regardless of how pin sharp everything is or if the exposure and composition are perfect.
    If I'm out with an idea or shoot in mind I want as much quality as I can get, but what is "quality"? For me and you they could be two (or a dozen) completely different things?
     
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  17. EightBitTony

    EightBitTony Well-Known Member

    Google ISO invariance and then lose 20 hours watching the arguments.
     
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  18. RovingMike

    RovingMike Crucifixion's a doddle...

    I'll take that as a no then. So why say it?
     
  19. Andrew Flannigan

    Andrew Flannigan Well-Known Member

    You may take it any way you like but in this case you're quite wrong.
     
  20. MickLL

    MickLL Well-Known Member

    Up to a point maybe - but as we have always said - horses for courses. No single rule fits all cases.

    If your final duck image in the newsletter had been as below then (I'm guessing) that you would not have used it.

    upload_2020-1-14_9-42-4.png

    MickLL
     
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