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DIY UV lens box ???

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by pixelpuffin, Jan 11, 2022.

  1. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I have some weather resistant lenses but they aren’t sealed. Despite seals in all the relevant places on both lens and camera body air not only can but must be able to enter and leave otherwise removing the lens would be difficult. Even weather resistant lenses, when removed from the camera, have a large opening at the lens mount. Should any moisture get inside such a lens it can be dried out by the normal means once detached from the body.

    We all know that cameras and lenses aren’t waterproof, with some exceptions, thus when rain is expected some sensible precautions would seem to be appropriate. Likewise when moving from a cold environment to a warm moist one. The most obvious precaution is “don’t remove the lens until conditions have improved”, another good reason to have more than one camera. Secondly, dry off any obvious water from your equipment as soon as possible. The use of external water resistant covers is also effective if seeking cover isn’t an option. I doubt any of this is new.

    The risk of fungus in a lens is, in practice, quite small. If you keep your camera/s and lenses in the bathroom it is more likely but I don’t know anyone who does that. Good ventilation and normal indoor humidity should be sufficient for safe storage of photographic equipment, most dealers don’t do otherwise.
     
  2. nimbus

    nimbus Well-Known Member

    Yes. I am a bit paranoid about fungus, any used lens I have bought with fungus present has immediately been bounced back whence it came-a peril of not buying an item locally. None of my lenses has developed fungus whilst in my possession.
     
  3. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    The only time I've seen fungus (touch wood) was when I bought an entire replacement kit after mine was burgled. One lens was full of it.

    All of my Canon kit (cameras and bodies) has been in the drawer for the last two Covid years and inside cases. I've been using my Fujis mainly because the camera drawer is full and the Fujis live in assorted camera bags and are more to hand. In a central-heated, double glazed house there shouldn't be much risk because it is fairly dry. It is damp conditions that are the main risk factor - I wouldn't keep photographic gear in a room with mildew or black mould.

    If I've been out in the rain I wipe the camera and lens dry and leave them out for some days. More importantly I open up the camera bag and let it dry out. Leaving a camera and lens inside a wet camera bag for an extended period of time is a sure way to get moisture inside the lens. Getting liquid water over the outside less so, unless it is immersed. The above for the UK. As said before, in the tropics, where both absolute and relative humidity are persistently high, it is perhaps a different story but cameras are still used there so the problem cannot be too great.
     
  4. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    Just to be clear
    I’m not trying to remove fungus - in my case extremely small traces. I just want to kill it!! It can stay thereafter so long as it’s dead!! This is why I asked about the UV lamps. If I can’t/don’t think it will work then I’ll send it back. But as previously said it’s so damn sharp, really is!!
    The one I owned before was like brand new, even had the bag on the lens, but it was so soft, even stopped down to f8 tripod mounted it was still soft. It seems such a waste if I have to send this copy back.
     
  5. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    If you have got fungus in a lens then don't keep it with other lenses and don't share a camera body.
     
  6. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    In that case it goes back
    I can cope with storing separately but allocating a body solely for that one lens is frankly ridiculous. I’ll wrap/pack tonight and post back tomorrow.
     
  7. MJB

    MJB Well-Known Member

    I thought it was advertised as spares?
     
  8. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Post #5 does suggest it was bought as faulty.
     
  9. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Post 5 actually sya
    No mention of fungus, just condensation, which has been cleared

    If what is visible is fungus it would be a good idea to find someone with a high intensity UV lamp and expose the lens for a while. It may not be fungus of course but I would still advise suitable treatment. The wavelength, 280 nm or 440 nm, isn't the intensity.
     
  10. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    I am very careful with my camera equipment but not to the extent of plastic boxes with silica and ultra violet lights. Do other members go to such lengths?
     
  11. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    You have to be kidding!
     
  12. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    The lens was purchased solely for video work using the M50 due to having a EVF. My son has said he wants me to video a few matches. I did a dummy run using the 55-250 is stm with my lad and a few of his mates running with a football- the lens didn’t really keep up. I knew that the 70-300 is ii is supposedly one of canons fastest AF lenses. I mentioned all this to the seller who assured me it”would blind the 55-250 AF wise” as the image is moving I’m assuming maximum lens sharpness is not as important as the ability to keep up.
    @ Pete
    Thank you, I’m trying to find a lamp with either 280nm or 400nm. The lens is again back inside a sealed bag with heated copper wrapped in a cloth. - I’m doing all I can until I get the uv light

    @Bazarchie
    I’m probably going OTT
    But I’d hate things to deteriorate due to either my own ignorance or laziness. There is no reason why my kit should not last until either I get bored or god forbid pop my clogs!
     
  13. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    You must be joking!
     
  14. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Before you do anything else, read this https://www.zeiss.co.uk/consumer-products/service/content/fungus-on-lenses.html then this may also be of interest, https://www.vintagecashcow.co.uk/blog/tips-and-tricks/camera-lens-fungus-a-guide/.
     
    zx9r and pixelpuffin like this.
  15. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    Indeed, it was meant to be tongue in cheek but the OP may be correct. I have looked after my photography equipment in the same way for over 40 years and have never had a problem. I try to avoid wet conditions but if the equipment does get wet I dry it with a towel/cloth and leave it out in centrally heated room to further dry it.
     
  16. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Taking care of equipment is one thing but keeping lenses in sealed boxes when they are not in use seems excessive. A great way to get them dry I agree but camera stores don’t go to those lengths. Generally a shop will have used lenses on shelves either in the window or in display cases, if there were a fungus problem it would become serious for them and they would change their methods.

    As it happens I don’t have a sealed box big enough for my 70-200 f2.8 so if it gets wet it is dried with paper towels and left, without caps, on the dining table or put in a bag with silica gel bags for a couple of hours. There just isn’t space to store my lenses in sealed boxes and I very much doubt there is any advantage in doing so, particularly as the most commonly used lenses get taken out several times a week. They were bought to use, not so that they could be protected.

    Clearly, anyone who wants to keep their equipment in its own dedicated environment is free to do so but, for me, that misses the whole point of having it in the first place.
     
    Bazarchie likes this.
  17. pixelpuffin

    pixelpuffin Well-Known Member

    It’s unfair to compare to a camera store. They are on display for a reason. I don’t “”Display”” any of my gear. There is only ever 1 camera and lens out at any one time unless I’ve packed or planned otherwise. It’s now common knowledge that the worst possible place to store unused gear is inside thick padded camera bags…especially thick padded camera bags in modern central heated homes!!
    I’m not out to antagonise anyone, I merely asked the question about UV light to kill what I suspect may be fungus. Even with a high powered led torch and a loupe I’m not convinced myself. But as the lens had been sold with condensation (now seems to have cleared) I would’ve liked to have blasted it with UV and my 100-400ii too….just to be on the safe side.
    A clear plastic box with silica sachets and lenses - no fabric whatsoever - is the best environment I can think off to store lenses that see little use. My L’s are all inside clear airtight tubes with silica, the rest just stored in plastic boxes (with silica).
     
  18. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Oh damn, that’s where my MF kit has been since I went digital in 2007.
     
  19. Bazarchie

    Bazarchie Well-Known Member

    News to me.Why is it deemed so bad? I have used such storage for over 40 years.
     
  20. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Is it? They could have lenses in transparent tubes if the wanted to do so but they don't. I assume they don't have fungus problems.

    As long as the bag and the lens are dry the only missing ingredient is ventilation. I've used camera bags for nearly 50 years but I have used the contents of said bags regularly.
    According to Zeiss the best way to store lenses is:
    Reduce the relative humidity to less than 60% (never under 30% as it is dangerous for the instrument) by storing:
    • in climate-control cabinets in which hygrometers maintain environmental conditions
    • next to driers (e.g. silica gel orange packs) in the containers
    • in a special cabinet whose interior is heated to 40°C (max. 50°C) using a fan heater/ incandescent lamps, thereby reducing the relative humidity
    • in hermetically sealed cabinets with fungicides with high vapor pressure (fungicide depot must be replaced at regular intervals)
     

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