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D780 has landed

Discussion in 'Nikon Chat' started by AndyTake2, Jan 7, 2020.

  1. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    I’ve never wanted a battery grip, being willing to use my camera with the shutter button at the bottom rather than incur the extra weight of a battery grip. (But I particularly appreciate the artificial horizon of my D800, which is absent from my D90, in this format.) When I first started investigating digital cameras, the photographic spec that impressed me was the D3X, but even at an acceptable price, I’d have rejected it because of its weight. But then I’ve never tried a camera with double grips; I didn’t realize how much I’d value an “L” bracket until I’d used one. However, if most users preferred a double grip, it should be better to build it into the camera rather than offer it as a bolt-on extra. I’m not aware of any double-grip DSLRs designed for high resolution (my preference) rather than high frame rates since the D3X, although Fujifilm have taken that route with their GFX100.

    Do we have access to any information on what proportion of users buy grips for their cameras? I assume it’s very few, which would make it inevitable that small production runs would lead to high prices. But that’s also a good reason for trying to maintain compatibility across ranges (as between Z6 and Z7) and from generation to generation.

    I can’t understand why anyone who wanted to bulk up their camera with extra batteries would prefer to do so with a simple box such as Nikon offer for the Z6/Z7, rather than one equipped with a set of controls for use in portrait mode!


    Chris
     
    IanG1957 likes this.
  2. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I first used an Autowinder with my OM1 in 1980, it was a revelation in handling, the camera was small and the shutter button in, to my mind, the wrong place but the winder made the camera the right size and put the shutter where I found it most comfortable. For the next ten years I has a motordrive or winder on all my cameras (OM1, OM2 and a pair of OM4s). In 1990 I bought a Nikon F4S, with the big grip and faster drive, since then I have only had two cameras that weren't equipped with a built-in grip; an FM2n with the motordrive and a Fuji Finepix S2Pro which was rapidly equipped with a grip designed for the F80. The Fuji produced great images but the handling was a disaster compared to the F5s I was using with film at the same time; it ate batteries too but that is another matter. One reason I but top of the range Nikons, used these days, is that they have a grip and everything is where I have come to expect it.

    I think the numbers will be propriety to Nikon but looking at the proportions of used bodies to grips it is probably around 1 in 20 for the latest bodies and around 1 in 10 for the D300/D300s/D700, that could obviously be skewed by the fact that those who have grips are keeping them.

    As I said previously, I expect the internal electronics of the grips differ very little between models why they have to make a different grip for each camera is beyond me.

    As I said the grip for the Z6/Z7 looks like a prototype made of Lego, next to useless unless you are planning to shoot video.
     
    IanG1957 likes this.
  3. IanG1957

    IanG1957 Well-Known Member

    For me it was simple - I didn't have any other choice. I often photograph circus performances and these last upwards of an hour, sometimes longer. Although I only use the EVF (everything else is turned off) I get through batteries I always shoot far too much. I can, obviously, turn the camera off and change batteries halfway through, but then I lose all my setup (very performance dependent), so it was easier for me to get the battery "box" that Nikon calls the MB-N10.

    If these manufacturers don't like physical contacts on the bottom plate, why don't they use Bluetooth? Seems perfectly reasonable to me...
     
  4. IanG1957

    IanG1957 Well-Known Member

    In your opinion...
     
  5. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    I’ve got grips for both my main cameras. They are not quite as ergonomic as the body of my Canon 1Div but I like that I can hold the camera in a consistent way whether for landscape or portrait orientation shots.
     
  6. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    So what do you think it looks like Ian?
     
  7. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    I know electronic displays run batteries down much faster than OVFs. I generally use live view when my D800 is on a tripod, and often need to replace the battery during a session. (But I don’t think I lose the settings in the process. Perhaps that’s an advantage of the D800’s memory banks over the U settings on a dial on the Z7, and, I think, most other Nikon cameras which don’t have the front-mounted 10-pin port.) So I understand your decision to get the MB-N10 power pack if nothing better is available, but I assume you’d rather have bought a traditional battery grip with a portrait mode set of controls.

    Chris
     
    IanG1957 likes this.
  8. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    That’s curious. I have a battery drain problem with my Canon (it loses 6% per day) so I store it without a battery. At first I expected it to lose settings because cameras no longer have back-up batteries but it seems to remember everything for weeks.
     
  9. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    That is because, despite your belief to the contrary, it has a clock battery. You just can't access it or change it, without a clock battery the camera would lose the date and time every time you changed the battery.

    A clock, unlike settings, cannot be in NVM it has to "run" otherwise it would stop when you took the battery out and restart when you put it back in, that isn't what happens.

    A certain reviewer*, who had already written reviews on the Nikon D2 and D3 noticed in the specification for the D4 that it used a CR1616 clock battery. He then ranted that this was a new departure for Nikon and not a good thing. Of course any one who had owned a D2 or D3 knew that they too used a CR1616 for the clock and that it was in exactly the same place as it is in the D4. I suspect the D5 and D6 are the same.

    *You may wish to guess who that might be.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2020
  10. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Certainly not a replaceable one like my old 5D. I think I read somewhere that a controlled discharge capacitor system was used these days for the clock. I’d expect camera settings to be in memory that doesn’t need power to keep it working.
     
  11. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    That would work well for a battery change but if you leave the battery out for weeks at a time a rather large capacitor would be required.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2020
  12. IanG1957

    IanG1957 Well-Known Member

    Perhaps I wasn't clear - the "settings" I'm talking about are things like +/- EV which are not 'retained' when the camera is turned off, or loses battery...

    I admit, I don't change a lot of things as most of what I want I've already "programmed" onto the U1/3 settings, but concert dependent settings are lost.



    Completely off-subject, we're confined to our homes here - and we can only go out with a signed, dated 'derogation' which allows us to go shopping or go to work, although 75% of us are working from home, me included. When we first heard of this move to restrict people I was rather hoping to have more time to go out with a camera - WRONG.

    Look after yourselves people - it's going to get worse before it gets better - stay inside, and avoid contact with anyone - really - anyone.
     
  13. IanG1957

    IanG1957 Well-Known Member

    Indeed - I have a built-in grip on the D3s and a real grip for the D850 - I like the 'hold' and use them often - well, I did, then I bought a Z6......

    ;)
     
  14. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    I’ve got my D800 back at last after Nikon’s repair, so I’ve been able to check. My D800 remembers the exposure compensation setting when I change the battery, although that setting isn’t stored in either of the sets of memory banks. (Neither is the bracketing setting, which I find very annoying, as I like to have it set to bracket exposures -/+ 0.7EV for hand-held shooting in available light, but not when using flash or on a tripod, when I’ll take the shot, and make adjustments as appropriate based on the previous result.)

    Chris
     
  15. IanG1957

    IanG1957 Well-Known Member

    Precisely my point - for some strange reason the Z series have lost this capability - which seems fundamental really, but I suppose this is just because I'm used to it on all my other equipment!

    (A bit like two-button card reformat - but PLEASE don't get me started on that...;) )
     

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