1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. REMINDER

    Any content, information, or advice found on social media platforms and the wider Internet, including forums such as AP, should NOT be acted upon unless checked against a reliable, authoritative source, and re-checked, particularly where personal health is at stake. Seek professional advice/confirmation before acting on such at all times.

D7000 kit lense issues.

Discussion in 'Nikon Chat' started by Ryan Foulkes, Jun 24, 2020.

Tags:
  1. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    So is that with really slow AF to enable smooth transitions between near and far?
     
  2. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Something like that
     
  3. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Nothing like that. Nikon seems to have produced P lenses to work well on modern DSLRs and also on the FTZ.
    The AF on the 70-300 P lens is faster than that on the older 70-300 AFS lens and even that is no slouch.
    Transitions between near and far are best handled by manual focus however I would not be surprised if firmware on future Z cameras might allow the user to set up slow transitions. The AF stepper motor might make this easier to achieve. I am not aware of any rumours that this will happen. Just pure speculation on my part.
     
  4. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Let's look at the whole conversation
    The exchange is about Video.
    In Video, smooth transitions are required and that means, relatively, slow changes. That doesn't mean that they can't achieve focus quickly when used for stills.
     
  5. AndyTake2

    AndyTake2 Well-Known Member

    I can remember somewhere in Nikon's blurb that the P lenses were easier to control remotely for focus - presumably focus following in video.
     
  6. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    When developing autofocus, Nikon and Pentax chose to try to maintain compatibility with their existing systems, Canon and Minolta (to be taken over by Sony) chose a fresh start, cutting off their existing customers, and Olympus quit the field (which they seem to be making a habit!)

    Introducing new features to an old system is almost certain to introduce some compatibility problems, yet my D800 could use pre-auto-focus lenses or screw-drive autofocus lenses that were obsolete well before it was designed, and this year I bought an excellent AF-P 70-300mm F4.5-5.6E lens which works fine although the AF-P type was introduced long after the D800 was discontinued.

    Canon’s EF mount was an excellent design, which appears to have coped with everything Canon have wanted to do with their DSLRs so far. That doesn’t guarantee that some new feature won’t be invented that would require a modification of the EF mount to implement it. But I guess there’s a fair chance that significant development of DSLRs will cease before that happens.

    New mounts all round were inevitable to get the full advantage of mirrorless bodies. However, Sony’s optics are constrained by a relatively small throat diameter that was designed for APS-C sensors, but was then carried over to full frame. (Nikon’s F mount is similarly narrow, presumably due to advances in optics that weren’t foreseen when the mount was designed.) Canon designed the EF-M mount for APS-C mirrorless, but, unlike Sony, designed the new, incompatible, R mount for full frame, cutting off what would otherwise be the most compelling reason for sticking with their brand if upgrading from APS-C to full frame. Meanwhile, Nikon have designed the Z mount that is excellent for full frame, but also covers APS-C. So looking forward, I think Nikon is in a better position with its mirrorless mount than Sony or Canon. (The L mount throat diameter is rather small compared to Nikon and Canon’s, but the alliance has the advantage of being compatible across three brands.)


    Chris
     
  7. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    It would be nice to read the end of the story.
     
  8. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    It's a never-ending story - at least until there is no such thing as a "camera" and there are no camera manufacturers left.

    BTW from the preceding post, surely Nikon's F-mount was developed for "full frame" even if it is narrow, as that was a popular size of film when it was launched.
     
  9. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Sorry I wasn't clear what I meant. Ryan's story. How was the issue resolved?
     
  10. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    Ah - well he said that couriers were being sent out to collect the AF-P lens that would not autofocus, So yes it would be good to find out if that happened and what lens he chose instead.

    Thinking about this, Nikon have not altered the number of connection contacts on the lenses/bodies of their cameras, so presumably it is just that they do not want to update the firmware of the D7000 and earlier cameras to make them compatible with the AF-P lenses
     
  11. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    Just because Nikon haven't updated the number of contacts doesn't mean they haven't used a previously unused contact or used used them in a different way. It isn't difficult to change the way you use contacts but retain backward compatibility. However, there are eight contacts in the lens mount of a D4 and there are ten contacts on a TC17 II so clearly there are two spare contacts available on the lens that aren't used bu the D4 (as every function on the lens attached to the TC17 works, my AF-S 70-200 f2.8 VRII doesn't use the extra contacts either). It is therefore very possible that the D7000 lacks the additional contacts and it isn't just a matter of firmware. By the way AF-P FX lenses work on the D4 but AF-P DX lenses don't
     
  12. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    Just checked: D7000 has 8 contacts, lenses have 10
     
  13. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    How many contacts do bodies that support AF-P lenses have?
     
  14. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    D5500 body: 8 contacts (facepalm)
     
  15. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    It's not that then!

    It was worth checking though.

    I do know that the D4 lacks a menu item in relation to VR control so it is bigger than just firmware.
     
  16. IvorETower

    IvorETower Little Buttercup

    In fact what is possibly more bizarre is that I counted 10 contacts on an old 18-70 (non-VR) lens, but the newer 18-140VR and the "kit" 18-55 AF-P lens each only have 8 contacts
     
  17. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    but are they all in the same place ?
     
  18. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    I should have realised that Nikon weren't going to make it that easy to determine why/how their new AF-P lenses are different.
     
  19. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    Yes, of course. I didn’t intend to suggest anything else, and commented that I presumed the reason that the size Nikon deemed appropriate for the full frame format when designing its F mount is similar to what Sony deemed appropriate for APS-C a few decades later is due to advances in optics that weren’t foreseen when the F mount was designed. I guess at that time manufacturers didn’t envisaged being able to make lenses with apertures such as f/1.2 and larger, and the F mount is appreciably larger than M42. (But the Sony E mount does offer more flexibility in that, with no mirror box, its constriction isn’t applied until much closer to the sensor).

    Chris
     
  20. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

Share This Page