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Cheese

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by John King, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    Cheese strings, babybel (so I can make little wax figures) and orange plastic burger cheese.;)
     
    EightBitTony likes this.
  2. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    You don't like cheese? ;)
     
    Learning and Zou like this.
  3. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Anything blue...
     
    Catriona likes this.
  4. SqueamishOssifrage

    SqueamishOssifrage Well-Known Member

    Cheddar - gorgeous!
     
    dream_police and Catriona like this.
  5. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    I see what you did there;)
     
    Mark101 and Zou like this.
  6. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    For the cheeseboard my favourites are Blue Stilton and white Wensleydale.
    For cooking, Strong Cheddar and Parmigiano-Reggiano.
    Sadly I have not found a British alternative for the latter..
     
  7. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    Just for technical correctness' sake, this is what a petri dish in a virus research lab is likely to look like, I hope your cheese doesn't have viral plaques!
    [​IMG]
     
    Catriona likes this.
  8. Zou

    Zou Well-Known Member

    I especially like sheep's milk cheeses and Italian cheeses. Pecorino of many types, parmesan, ricotta, mozzarella, scamorza, etc. Plus proper cheddar, crowdie, and in small quantities brie, feta and so on.
     
    Catriona likes this.
  9. John King

    John King Well-Known Member

    Not quite, but when I came back after a week away it wasn't far off! The bit that is grey in the picture, if you change that to pale yellow it looks even closer still

    Out of curiosity is the mould on cheese poisonous, or can it be eaten? (not that I am going to)
     
  10. John King

    John King Well-Known Member

    A bit like this (Apologies to the originator of the image):):(:D:oops:
     

    Attached Files:

  11. gray1720

    gray1720 Well-Known Member

    Toxicity of the mould is going to depend on what sort it is - obviously some are quite harmless (see blue cheese for details), but fungal toxins can be fairly nasty. I'll risk a bit of cheese mould, but when it starts to wave at me...
     
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  12. DaveS

    DaveS Well-Known Member

    I find that real mature cheddar keeps will in the fridge, but I've found low fat varieties go mouldy very quickly.
    Parmesan keeps well too.
     
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  13. dream_police

    dream_police Well-Known Member

    In all seriousness I am not a big cheese fan. If it stinks I will not eat it (apart from Taleggio cheese which I use in a potato dish). If it comes already mouldy, forget it. Why eat cheese with mould running through it? (again Taleggio with it's pink furry crust is an exception.) I love goats cheese, Manchego, feta, haloumi, Cheshire, Lancashire, Cheddar. Don't like real strong vintage ones though.

    Smoked Mozzarella is pretty good too.
     
  14. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    I think, with cheese, it depends on the quality of the milk used. French cheeses taste so much better than most of ours. Same goes for butter. Our milk is now so tasteless it is not surprising that cheese lacks taste and qualities associated with real milk. I bought some milk produced at a dairy in Gigha. Comes in a real glass bottle too! Got cream at the top. The taste was just as it used to be in my childhood - pre pasteurisation and homogenisation. Totally so diferent even from blue top ordinary milk, which seemed watery after tasting that one.
     
  15. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Can't give you a like for that. I once politely accepted a generous portion of Danish blue.It was so salty that it almost made me vomit. Sadly the social situation demanded that I ate it. It was disgusting.
     
  16. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Why do you think that French milk is better than British? Perhaps they export the best product and feed the worst to the cheapest suburbs of Paris; after fermentation of course. Your European tastes are going to cost you very shortly in duty. Hopefully some of that duty finds its way to British farmers in a scheme very different to that designed for French farmers. Of course on your island it should be pretty easy to remove the need for pasteurisation if you take a robust approach to bloody badgers. The Western (and Northern) islands should be producing much of the best cow, goat and sheep cheeses in Britain. I hope that I live long enough to taste it..
     
  17. Catriona

    Catriona Well-Known Member

    You do talk a lot of bullocks after your liquid refreshment! Haha!

    No point in refuting all the above...
     
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  18. Learning

    Learning Ethelred the Ill-Named

    Well I admit that my liquid refreshment came from Europe and will shortly cost me more in duty. This evening a half litre of acceptable Rioja. I am just finishing it. You will never produce drinkable red wine.
    But why refute what I have written. Your isolation on the islands should allow you to get to a state in which the pasteurisation of milk is not needed. You have cows, sheep and goats in conditions that do not cause fast low cost production. With a good product and smart marketing, milking island images, as well as the beasts, you could invent a 'traditional' industry. The English and Americans would lap it up.
     
  19. spinno

    spinno Well-Known Member

    Of course there are exceptions to every rule. Buying Danish Blue pre-packed at the supermarket ensures it comes with a fresh supply of seawater:rolleyes:
     
  20. Trannifan

    Trannifan Well-Known Member

    A few years ago, the food hall of a big store in town had Sage Derby amongst the other cheeses. I can remember asking, when it was my turn, for a chunk of it. The customer next to me looked at this and voiced the opinion that, because of the green veins, it must be seriously 'off'. I told her it was sage, not mould. The salesperson cut off a small piece and passed it over. The customer very cautiously looked at it, sniffed it and then took a small bite......"Hey, that's not bad at all!"

    Lynn
     
    Learning likes this.

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