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Carrying a camera with a large lens

Discussion in 'General Equipment Chat & Advice' started by -Froglet-, Aug 6, 2017.

  1. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    We went on a U3A coach trip, and naturally I took my camera gear. Yes, it was busy, but the birds (both pinioned and wild) seemed accustomed to people, and it didn’t make much difference. Most of my shots were of the otters and pinioned, mainly exotic, wildfowl. Think Slimbridge but on a smaller scale, and without the views of the estuary (although I haven’t been to Slimbridge for decades). I think other, quieter and less artificial-looking, sites might be better for photographs of wild birds, although I believe the London Wetland Centre has an impressive record of sightings.

    Chris
     
    Bazarchie likes this.
  2. Tinki

    Tinki Member

    Get a decent backpack and use it. A camera on the back is a lot easier to carry than one hanging from your neck and it's a lot safer too. The only downside is that you need to pull it our to shoot with it, and that kills getting any spontaneous shots. I've used a Kata (now owned and branded as Manfrotto) for years and will need to replace it as it is starting to wear out.
    The tripod sits in a pouch attached to the back of my backpack.
     
    ChrisNewman likes this.

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