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Can I save a cropped .NEF file from Nikon Capture NX-D?

Discussion in 'Digital Image Editing & Printing' started by ChrisNewman, Mar 28, 2020.

  1. ChrisNewman

    ChrisNewman Well-Known Member

    Thanks Terry, but when I took the shots I’m trying to work on, I was scarcely aware of HDR. I saw an attractive view, and wanted to get a well-exposed shot of it. I had exposure compensation on my D90 set to -⅔EV (which often worked well on the D90), and shot my usual bracketed set of 3, producing -⅔EV, 0EV and -1⅓ EV. I then checked the monitor as well as I could without putting on reading glasses (my wife was impatient to continue our walk), saw that key areas were over-exposed even in the -1⅓ EV shot, so followed my usual practice of reducing the exposure compensation by 1EV and shooting another set of 3. These still showed over-exposure, so I reduced by a further 1⅔EV, and the -4EV shot didn’t show over-exposure. At the time I was extremely disappointed that most of the JPEGs showed the foreground foliage, in the shade, as black, while the others showed the distant areas, in sunshine, almost white. After the holiday I tried working on the -4EV RAW file, and was delighted how much detail and colour could be restored to the foliage, but it was still far inferior to that from the brighter shots where the sunlit detail was burned out.

    If I was shooting with the intention of applying HDR, and knowing what I know now, my D90 has better bracketing options, and the D800 I now use, much better still. And I’m well aware that it would be better to use a tripod or HDR if possible.
    These are the shots I have. I want to find out whether Aurora HDR 2018 can generate better images from extreme contrast than I can get by lightening the shadows of a dark image, and I consider it a very attractive scene, so I’d like to evaluate Aurora on these if I can, rather than some nondescript shots taken just to have a high contrast range, when I’d be struggling to decide whether I’d made a good edit of something inevitably boring. Unfortunately Aurora doesn’t report that it’s failed to align the shots, never mind what is preventing alignment. As there was nothing close in the scene, I’m hoping that parallax isn’t a significant problem, and that if I can edit files to almost eliminate differences in the angle of view and twist of the camera, I might get satisfactory alignment. But I don’t see any alternative to trial and error in trying to establish that.

    Chris
     
  2. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    It was Windows Vista that drove me to Apple. I have Capture NX2 on my iMac and, as I said this can save an edited file as a .NEF but View, irrespective of version, isn't really an editing tool and I only use it as a viewer. Unfortunately Capture NX and Capture NX2 were not free, Capture NX2 can be bought for something over £200 but really isn't worth the money, I would say that Capture NX-D is less capable than NX2 and certainly doesn't offer saving as .NEF only JPEG or TIFF.

    I have to agree with others that your best bet would be to use TIFF files to feed your HDR software and forget about trying to use NEF files.
     
  3. PeteRob

    PeteRob Well-Known Member

    Catalina (10.15) might drive you to Windows 10.
     
  4. GeoffR

    GeoffR Well-Known Member

    It would have to be pretty bad given that updates to Windows 10 are known to change settings for some software. Any way I won't be going beyond Mojave until I can either afford to do without Office or I buy several copies.
     

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